History of Jute Industries

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  • Topic: Jute, Bangladesh, West Bengal
  • Pages : 25 (7595 words )
  • Download(s) : 142
  • Published : December 2, 2012
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Chapter 1: Introduction

1. Introduction

Jute is a natural fiber with golden and silky shine and is known well as The Golden Fiber. It is the cheapest vegetable fiber procured from the skin of the plant's stem. Jute is the second most important vegetable fiber after cotton, in terms of usage, global consumption, production, and availability. It has high tensile strength, low extensibility, and ensures better breath ability of fabrics.

Jute fiber is 100% bio-degradable and recyclable and thus environmentally friendly.  It is one of the most versatile natural fibers that have been used in raw materials for packaging, textiles, non-textile, construction, and agricultural sectors. It helps to make best quality industrial yarn, fabric, net, and sacks. 

Jute, the golden fiber, is the raw material for one of Bangladesh’s oldest industries. The first jute mill started production in Bengal in 1856.After more than 150 years; the jute industry is now challenged by competition from alternative materials, by the recession in the international markets and by low awareness among consumers of the versatile, eco-friendly nature of jute fabric itself. Yet this industry still provides a livelihood to more than 250,000 mill workers and more than 4 million farmers’ families. It is a golden bond with the Earth; its use is a statement about ecological awareness as it is a fully bio-degradable and eco-friendly fiber. It comes from the earth, it helps the earth and once its life is done it merges back into the earth.

Advantages of jute include good insulating and antistatic properties, as well as having low thermal conductivity and moderate moisture regain. It includes acoustic insulating properties and manufacture with no skin irritations. Jute has the ability to be blended with other fibers, both synthetic and natural, and accepts cellulosic dye classes such as natural, basic, vat, sulfur, reactive, and pigment dyes. While jute is being replaced by relatively cheap synthetic materials in many uses, but jute’s biodegradable nature is suitable for the storage of food materials, where synthetics would be unsuitable.

1. Report Background

One of the unavoidable aspects of modern business studies is exposure to the practical experiences. As a part of the BBA program requirement, I was assigned by my honorable course instructor Prof. Dr. Nargis Akhter to prepare a Project Work on “The History of Jute Industries” to fulfill the requirement of 3 credit course, Course Code: BUS 498. It endowed me with the opportunities to experience the real life exposure to the Jute sectors of Bangladesh.

2. Methodology

In order to prepare the project report I use both secondary and primary data. For primary data I talked to some employees of BJMC and BJMA over phone and face to face. I also crosschecked the information found over the internet by some people. For secondary data, I used the vast knowledge of internet, the websites of different research organizations, different news websites and different article found in the internet.

3. Scope & Limitations

For this report, I used graphs, chart, tables etc to show necessary information. Firstly, the history of jute industry in the Indian subcontinent has been described elaborately. The history is divided into four parts such as, Ancient Period, Pre-colonial period, post colonial period, after nationalization. The production, sales, contribution of jute industries in Bangladeshi economy, present condition, labor unrest, industrial relations situations etc. are discussed afterwards. Finally I have sum up by some recommendations and showing my findings and analysis.

Chapter 2: Literature Review

2. Literature Review

The paper titled “Jute Manufacturing Sector of Bangladesh; Challenges, Opportunities and Policy Options”, written...
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