History of Bangladesh and Chittagong

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Chittagong
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This article is about Chittagong as a city in Bangladesh. For other uses, see Chittagong (disambiguation). Chittagong/Chatgaon|
—  Metropolis  —|
Colonial Circuit House, Commonwealth War Cemetery, Foy's Lake, Patenga Beach| Nickname(s): Port City|
Chittagong/ChatgaonLocation of Chittagong in Bangladesh|
Coordinates: 22°22′0″N 91°48′0″E|
Country| Bangladesh|
Division| Chittagong Division|
District| Chittagong District|
Establishment| 1340[1]|
Granted city status| 1863[2]|
Government|
 • City Mayor| M. Manzur Alam|
Area[3]|
 • Metropolis| 168 km2 (65 sq mi)|
Population (2008)[4]|
 • Metropolis| 2,579,107|
 • Density| 15,351/km2 (39,760/sq mi)|
 • Metro| 5 680 000 (2,011e)|
 • Demonym| Chatgaiya/Chittagongian|
Time zone| BST (UTC+6)|
Postal code| 4000|
GDP (2008)| $25.5 billion[5]|
GDP growth (2008)| 6.3%[5]|
Calling code| 31|
Website| Chittagong City Corporation|
Chittagong (Bengali: চাটগাও,Chatgaon, চট্টগ্রাম, Chôţţogram) is the main seaport and second largest city in Bangladesh. It straddles the hills at the estuary of the Karnaphuli River and faces the Bay of Bengal to the west. The city has an estimated population of over 6.5 million people and is the administrative capital of Chittagong Division.[6] An ancient and historic gateway to Bengal, Chittagong was a major port on the silk route. The region was frequented by Arab, Persian, Chinese, Malay, Turkic, Burmese and Portuguese merchants; and attracted numerous explorers such as Ibn Battuta and Admiral Zheng He. After defeating the last independent Nawab of Bengal, the British East India Company took control of the port in the 18th century.[7] The modern city emerged under the British Raj with the development of the Assam Bengal Railway. During World War II, it served as an important base for Allied Forces fighting in the Burma Campaign. After the partition of British India, the city became became part of East Bengal (later East Pakistan). In 1971, as the Pakistan Army launched military operations against Bengali nationalists and civilians, the declaration of Bangladesh's independence was announced from the city.[8] Chittagong is often regarded as Bangladesh's commercial capital; it generates 12% of national GDP; 40% of industrial output and 80% of maritime trade (see Port of Chittagong).[6] It is home to many of Bangladesh's largest and oldest corporations, including those involved in textiles, shipping, petroleum, steel, shipbuilding, pharmaceuticals, automotive industry, chemicals, tea, commodities and logistics. It is also one of the fastest growing cities in the world.[5][9][10] In recent years, neighboring countries have looked to the port city as a future regional gateway to landlocked southern Asia, including northeast India, Bhutan, Nepal, southwest China and parts of Burma.[11][12][13]Chittagong intends to emerge as a regional economic hub in South and East Asia, and is undertaking various megaprojects, including a deep sea port, tri-nation highways and railways.[14][15] Contents * 1 Etymology * 2 History * 2.1 1930 Chittagong Uprising * 2.2 World War II * 2.3 Post WWII and Bangladesh * 3 Geography and climate * 4 Demographics * 5 Civil administration * 6 People and Culture * 6.1 Architecture * 7 Economy and development * 8 Famous residents * 9 Media and communications * 10 Tourism * 10.1 Chittagong Hill Tracts * 10.2 Patenga beach * 10.3 Foy's Lake * 10.4 Heritage Park * 10.5 Chittagong Ethnological Museum * 10.6 WWII cemetery and Circuit House * 11 Education * 12 Health * 13 Transport * 14 Dialect * 15 Sports * 16 Sister cities * 17 See also * 18 Gallery * 19 References * 20 External links| Etymology

Jean Bernoulli, in his book Description Historique et Geographic de L'Inde (1786), explains...
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