History Cxc Adjustments to Emancipation

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Adjustments to Emancipation|
Coming of the Chinese, Europeans, Indians and Africans |
Akia Selver|

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 1 2. Bakcground………………………………………………………………………………………… Page 2 3. Africans……………………………………………………………………………………………… Page 3 4. Europeans…………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 5. Madeirans…………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 6. East Indians……………………………………………………………………………………….. Page 7. Contracts……………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 8. Effects………………………………………………………………………………………………… Page 9. Bibliography ………………………………………………………………………………………...Page

INTRODUCTION
This project is based on the topic Adjustments to Emancipation from 1838 – 1876. It focuses on the Coming of the Chinese, Europeans, Indians and Africans into the Caribbean. Information is provided about their reasons for migration, working conditions and their effects on the Caribbean.

Slavery was the initial labour system used by Europeans on their plantations in the Caribbean. It was implemented in the 1600s, the Europeans forcefully took people from the African continent to the Caribbean on various trips. The path in which the slaves were carried between Africa and the Caribbean is now known to historians as the triangular trade. These Africans and those from the African lineage became slaves on the plantations where they were not seen as humans and were treated as animals or property. After the freedom of the enslaved population on the plantations in the 1830s, the planters were faced with irregularity of labour on the estates. This was because many of the slaves had left the plantation to go start a new life. In addition, the remaining population had cultivated land of their own; often when it was harvest time instead of harvesting the crops on the estates, the freed people would harvest their own crops which posed a problem to the planters. As a result of this major problem, planters now had to develop new strategies to regulate the labour force on the estates. A major remedy to the inconsistency of the labour on the estates was the importation of indentured workers.

AFRICANS
Since Britain had abolished the slave trade, her warships had patrolled the seas looking for foreign boats carrying slaves. Most of the captures they were of Brazilian and Cuban ships. When they were released they were usually taken to two British colonies, St Helena or Sierrre Leone. both colonies were in danger of being overcrowded so the British government was willing to encourage the liberated Africans to emigrate to the Caribbean. Most of the imported were free slaves, most notably of the Jamaican Maroons deputed in 1796.

After 1841 most liberated Africans were brought to the Caribbean either as soon as they were taken from a slave ship or after a short time on St Helena. these Africans were unused to European ways and had not been seasoned to plantation labour. They usually left the plantations as soon as they could and settled as squatters in the interiors.

The scheme lasted from 1841 to about 1862. It was very popular at first but declined after 1850 for two reasons. Firstly the private ships that were chartered at the beginning to carry the emigrants from African made the Africans think about slavery all over again. secondly the agents in west Africa undoubtedly lured the Africans with false promises of money and land. As soon as the news leaked back it was hard to attract more Africans.

A total of 36000 immigrants arrived.

COUNTRY| # of Immigrants|
British Guiana| 14000|
Jamaica| 10000|
Trinidad| 8000|

The rest arrived in Grenada, St Vincent, St Lucia and St Kitts.

EUROPEANS

Jamaica was the main country to import European labour. This was done to raise the white population and at the same time provide plantation labour. This experiment was a failure. From 1834 to 1838, thousands of Scots and Irish and a few hundred Germans came to...
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