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I agree, the Ancient Greek city-states were often at odds with each other. People

from other city-states were not as highly regarded as they regarded themselves and they

mostly went to war with each other for control over the peninsula. When the Persians

threatened all of Greece, they had no choice but to unite. This also showed them an

enemy that was far more different from them than people from other Greek-city states.

Continuous conflict and competition between city-states broke down a sense of

community in Greece. Constant war divided the Greek city-states into shifting alliances;

it was also very costly to all the citizens.

1.Greeks were characterized first and foremost by their fervent belief in the need for freedom, equality and tolerance. Evaluate this statement?

Liberty or freedom in ancient Greece represented the status of the free man and

woman as opposed to that of the slave. The division between free people and slaves was

deemed to be a social and natural institution. Free status was identified by a set of various

rights and privileges. One of the rights of free individuals was to own other individuals as

slaves. Similarly, the political freedom of a community also represented the enslavement

of other communities.

2.To what extent was Athens a true democracy?

The biggest difference between Athenian democracy and almost all the following

democracies is that the Athenian version was direct rather than being representative. With
a few exceptions, Athenians didn't vote for politicians to represent them; all Athenians

voted on just about every law or policy the city was to adopt. Shall we fight the Spartans?

The people vote and decide. Raise taxes? Build a navy? The people decide.

3.What was so revolutionary about Greek thought? What ideas continue to influence the West today?

Greek philosophy is the origin of western culture and its institutions: art,...
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