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Historical Investigation: to What Extent Were the Motives of Marcus Brutus and Cassius Longius Conspiring Against Julius Caesar Political Rather Than Personal?

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  • April 1, 2013
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To what extent were the motives of Marcus Brutus and Cassius Longius conspiring against Julius Caesar political rather than personal?| |
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2011-2013 Candidate number: 001386- 041 Gabvin Raphaël Branglidor Word count: 1997

Part A:
The aim of this essay is to discuss whether the death of Julius Caesar by acquaintances Marcus Brutus and Cassius Longius was due to political or personal motives. The focus will lay in understanding Rome’s political situation at the time, evaluating Caesar’s policies and the possible explanations resulting in Caesar’s assassination. The essay will begin by explaining the political situation in Rome at the time in order to understand the tensions between Caesar and the Senate. The concluding part of the investigation will discuss Caesar’s policies and relationship with his assassinators in order to evaluate their motives. The time period looked at will range from Rome in 49 BC to the death of Caesar in 44BC. Suetonius’s “The Twelve Caesar’s” and Adrian Goldsworthy’s “Life of a Colossus” will be used as main references to answering the question with additional primary and secondary accounts and sources from the internet. Part B:

Emerging victorious in Spain, Caesar began being heaped with numerous honours from the Senate. Instantaneously, Caesar was honoured with the right to wear clothing similar to the kings. Dressed with the title of Imperator for his life, Caesar acquired comparable powers to that of the magistracy and consuls though Caesar could still be vetoed. Shortly afterwards, a first of three ivory statues in Caesar’s honour were sought to be carried during all public religious processions. A second statue was placed in the sacrosanct temple of Quirinus ; inscribed on it, ‘To the Invincible God.’ According to Suetonius, “Cassius grew to loathe Caesar” after the emergence of his third statue alongside the former seven Roman Kings and...