Historical Development of Cosmetics Indusrty

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  • Topic: Cosmetics, Lipstick, Helena Rubinstein
  • Pages : 10 (3992 words )
  • Download(s) : 440
  • Published : November 27, 2010
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The word “cosmetics” comes from the Greek word kosmetikos meaning “skilled in adornment” (Sage 33). The evolution of cosmetics has truly changed through the centuries. The way people wear makeup and the reasons why they wear it have changed dramatically over time. The Roman philosopher, Plautus, once wrote, “A women without paint is like food with out salt.” The attraction of a beautiful face did not appear yesterday; painted ladies and even gentlemen have been known through time in artwork and illustrations. The art of cosmetics has definitely changed over time and through different cultures including: Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, French, Italians, and Americans.

The first archaeological evidence of cosmetics usage was found in Egypt around 3500 BC during the Ancient Egypt times with some of royalty owning make-up, such as Nefertiti, Nefertari, mask of Tutankhamun, etc. The Ancient Greeks and Romans[citation needed] also used cosmetics. The Romans and Ancient Egyptians used cosmetics containing poisonous mercury and often lead. The ancient kingdom of Israel was influenced by cosmetics as recorded in the Old Testament—2 Kings 9:30 where Jezebel painted her eyelids—approximately 840 BC. The Biblical book of Esther describes various beauty treatments as well. In the Middle Ages, although its use was frowned upon by Church leaders, many women still wore cosmetics. A popular fad for women during the Middle Ages was to have a pale-skinned complexion, which was achieved through either applying pastes of lead, chalk, or flour, or by bloodletting. Women would also put white lead pigment that was known as "ceruse" on their faces to appear to have pale skin. Cosmetic use was frowned upon at many points in Western history. For example, in the 19th century, make-up was used primarily by prostitutes, and Queen Victoria publicly declared makeup improper, vulgar, and acceptable only for use by actors. Adolf Hitler told women that face painting was for clowns and not for the women of the master race. Women in the 19th century liked to be thought of as fragile ladies. They compared themselves to delicate flowers and emphasised their delicacy and femininity. They aimed always to look pale and interesting. Sometimes ladies discreetly used a little rouge on the cheeks, and used "belladonna" to dilate their eyes to make their eyes stand out more. Make-up was frowned upon in general especially during the 1870s when social etiquette became more rigid. Actresses however were allowed to use make up and famous beauties such as Sarah Bernhardt and Lillie Langtry could be powdered. Most cosmetic products available were still either chemically dubious, or found in the kitchen amid food colorings, berries and beetroot. By the middle of the 20th century, cosmetics were in widespread use by women in nearly all industrial societies around the world. Cosmetics have been in use for thousands of years. The absence of regulation of the manufacture and use of cosmetics has led to negative side effects, deformities, blindness, and even death through the ages. Examples of this were the prevalent use of ceruse (white lead), to cover the face during the Renaissance, and blindness caused by the mascara Lash Lure during the early 20th century. The worldwide annual expenditures for cosmetics today is estimated at $19 billion.[5] Of the major firms, the largest is L'Oréal, which was founded by Eugene Schueller in 1909 as the French Harmless Hair Colouring Company (now owned by Liliane Bettencourt 26% and Nestlé 28%; the remaining 46% is traded publicly). The market was developed in the USA during the 1910s by Elizabeth Arden, Helena Rubinstein, and Max Factor. These firms were joined by Revlon just before World War II and Estée Lauder just after. Beauty products are now widely available from dedicated internet-only retailers,[6] who have more recently been joined online by established outlets, including the major department stores and traditional bricks and mortar...
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