Hist 1301

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United States 1301
April 1st, 2013
Mr. Maloney
Details Leading to the War of 1812
When the United States of America were establishing, there were many conflicts, battles, and wars that followed to achieve their independence. One of those wars was the war of 1812, in which the United States fought against Britain. The war of 1812 had a major effect on the future of our country. The United States has won most of its wars, often evolving with significant concessions from the enemy. But the War of 1812 was different. The nation was lucky to escape without making extensive concessions itself. The Treaty of Ghent, which ended the conflict, said nothing about the oceanic issues that had caused the war and contained nothing to suggest that America had achieved its goals. Instead, it simply provided for returning to the status quo ante bellum – the state that had existed before the war. The trial of the war was spoiled by considerable unskilled and mismanagement. This was partly due to the nature of the republic. The nation was too young and immature, and its government too weak and inexperienced to act against a major war efficiently. Politics also played a part. Federalists strongly opposed the conflict, and so did some Republicans. Even those who supported the war argued among themselves and never displayed the sort of patriotic interest that has been so evident in other American wars. The supporters of war appeared to support the conflict more with their heads than their hearts, and more with their hearts than their purses. As a result, efforts to raise men and money lagged far behind need. Despite the inexperienced and half-hearted support that described this conflict, the War of 1812 was not without its rousing moments and terrific victories. American success at the Thames in the Northwest, the victories at Chippewa and Fort Erie on the Niagara front, the rousing defense of Baltimore in the Chesapeake, and the crushing defeat of the British at...
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