Hispanics and Higher Education

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Hispanics/Latinos and Higher Education

I.Introduction
A. Introduction: Society keeps the hype that higher education is the key to success, so if one graduates one has take several steps forward to succeed in life (Sewell, Shah). Such success comes easy for white Americans since a study done by Newsweek (2011) an online news company demonstrated that 9 out of 10 white Americans graduate in four years meanwhile 5 out of 10 minorities graduate in 7 years. Why is this? B. Background: Some more background for you, did you know that in California less than 15 percent of Hispanics hold a bachelors degree, and near 10 percent of African Americans hold a bachelors compared to 34 percent of white Americans. If we take what Shah and Sewell comment about success, why isn’t minority success the same? C. Relevance: In order to have a bigger picture of the world, and be informed of social injustices D. Credibility: I am a Hispanic/Latino American who has taken two Latin American Studies courses, one focusing on higher education. Besides it wouldn’t be the same if an Anglo-American gave this speech E. Preview of Main Points:

1. Problem: Very few role models in Hispanic/Latino American lives with higher education degrees 2. Problem: Schools in low income communities do not have the same funding that schools in high income communities have 3. Solution: Higher funding for schools in low income communities

Transition 1: William Sewell and Vimal Shah (1967), retired doctorate professors of sociology at the University of Wisconsin state that role models in society are used to set the bar of success by others.

II.First Main Point: Hispanics/Latinos have very few role models in their lives A. Third Generation Hispanic/Latinos apply to college
1. Beginning with immigrant workers in the 1950s and 60s, due to the migratory status of first generation Hispanics/Latinos College was not an option since financial aid was not available to them nor was there many jobs available to them. Therefore they would end up with weak economic stability (Ovink, Veazey, 2011). 2. Following the line second generation Hispanics/Latinos did not apply to college but instead searched a job right after high school (if they graduated) to help their parents with their debt (2011). 3. It’s usually a third generation Hispanic American who applies to college since the parents might have more economic stability than the grandparents and since more financial aid makes college affordable (2011).

B. Not many Hispanic Role Models
4. If it takes two to three generations for Hispanics/Latino Americans to attend college, there is a lack of role models for them to set the bar. a. Compared to white Americans who have had generations going to college, and who only need to turn on the television to see an individual with a degree (MacDonald, Botti, Hoffman, 2010).

5. White Americans have many more role models
b. Take for example an Ivy League school; a minority must apply with pure merit mean while a person with a certain last name or certain amount donated gets instant admission (2010). c. There are not many Hispanic/Latino American individuals who have a large sum or amount of money to donate to schools nor are there many renowned Latinos (2010).

6. The article by these three individuals (2010) continues to state that the only role models Latinos really have is movie actors and music artist who are usually not even American

Transition Statement 2: Lets look at the second problem though.

III.Second Main Point: Lack of economic aid to low income communities, A. Low funding for schools in low income schools
1. Due to recent budget cuts teachers are being laid off while the number of students continues to grow, creating bigger class sizes (Clemmitt, 2007) 2. Less individual attention to each student (2007)

3. Take Southern...
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