Hispanic/Latino Culture Essay

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HISPANIC/LATINO CULTURE
Hispanics or Latinos are defined as a people of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South or Central American, or other Spanish speaking culture. This term “Hispanics” was created by the U.S. federal government in the early 1970’s to refer to Americans born in a Spanish speaking nation or with ancestry to Spanish territories. Hispanics people are vibrant, socializing, and fun loving people. Among various facts associated to this culture is that they have a deep sense of involvement in their family traditions and cultures. Hispanics / Latinos have strong non-verbal and verbal ways of communication. To better understand one another they overly rely the use of non-verbal communication. This includes facial expressions, hand and body movements, physical touch, voice pitch, voice sounds, and physical appearances. A Hispanic mother screaming as her child takes their first steps is a type of sound and facial expressions use to show emotion without words. A firm handshake is a common practice between people as greeting and as they leave. A hug and a light kiss on a cheek are also common greetings practices between woman, and men and woman who are close friends or family. Children are also though to practice this ways of greetings to their elders in a way to show respect. Men also hug each other in sign of affection. Making eye contact when being spoken to is also a sign of respect, especially if the person is elder. I remember if my mother was talking to me as a child and I looked away, I was in so much trouble! Non-verbal communication is very important in face-to-face communication also because it shows feelings, intentions, and reactions. In the Hispanic culture respect is highly valued and shown by using formal titles when communicating verbally. Communicating phrases are used daily like “A sus ordenes” (at your command), “para servirle a usted” (at your service), “mi reyna” (my queen), or “mi rey” ( my king). When it comes to advice, Hispanic...
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