Hiroshima and Night

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Lavinia Cantus
Mrs. Uehling Block 1
Hiroshima and Night

Hiroshima and Night are two novels about one of the world’s most powerful and destructive wars. In Hiroshima, Hersey writes of the events that began on August 6, 1945. Hiroshima is told through the memories of six survivors: Miss Toshiko Sasaki, Dr. Masakazu Fujii, Mrs. Hatsuyo Nakamura, Father Wilhelm Kleinsorge, Dr. Terufumi Sasaki, and Reverend Kiyoshi Tanimoto, and Hersey makes sure to never let his readers forget their stories. Every one of those six people experiences their share of death, destruction, and dehumanization. Elie Wiesel contributes similar concepts in Night. But instead of other people putting forth their stories, Elie Wiesel shares his own war story by narrating his experiences in the Nazi concentration camps. The novels are deeply personal to the readers because of the issues both are portraying. Hundreds of thousands of innocent people dying, hundreds of homes destroyed, and each person feeling in their own way like an animal, has to be the interior of every war. The beginning of World War Two held these facts the strongest. Both Hiroshima and Night are told from beginning to end, from start to finish, and from win to loss. The people in Hiroshima and Night are telling their stories from the times where everything was right in the world to where they just didn’t think it could get any worse. Both John Hersey and Elie Wiesel especially stressed the reality that hundreds of thousands of people died during these two periods of history. In Hiroshima, Hersey puts in one passage that is absolute, factual information and not from the opinions of one of the survivors. Statistical workers gathered what figures they could on the effects of the bomb. They reported that 78,150 people had been killed, 13,983 were missing, and 37,425 had been injured. No one in the city government pretended that these figures were accurate-though the Americans accepted them as official-and as the...
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