Hip Hop's Betrayal of Black Women

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The recent article that I have read sheds, more than enough, light on a situation that many people consider not being relevant. “Celie’s Revenge: Hip Hop’s Betrayal of Black Women” written by Jennifer McLune relates to the feelings of many women in today’s society. Being referred to as bitches and hoes in the music that we hear every day, on the radio, TV, etc., is a disgrace to all whether they feel so or not. This article is a response to Kevin Powell’s article “Notes of a Hip Hop Head”. In his article, Kevin states “just as it was unfair to demonize men of color in the 60’s solely as wild-eyed radicals when what they wanted, amidst their fury, was a little freedom and a little power, today it is wrong to categorically dismiss hip-hop without taking into consideration the socioeconomic condition (and the many record labels that eagerly exploit on benefit from the ignorance of many of these young artists) that have led to the current state of affairs.” Jennifer then begins to explain that Kevin’s argument completely ignores the fact that women, too, are raised in this environment of poverty and violence, but have yet to produce the same negative and hateful representation of black men that male rappers are capable of making against women. (3 McLune). Powell’s article seems to reveal the fact that poverty is the reason for sexism and it should be excused because of it. Knowing that wealthy white boys can execute the same hateful lyrics as poor black boys, gives Jennifer the idea that his reasons are just ridiculous. The faculties of the record labels are not the only ones to blame in this situation. As artist and role models to our society they should take more responsibility in their music as well as their actions and what they represent. Many artists appear to only care about their own mainstream acceptance than wanting to make positive changes in hip hop’s culture. “…Common, The Roots, Talib Kweli and others- remain inconsistent, apologetic and even eager to...
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