Himalayan Mineral Water Vfx Case Study

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Himalayan Mineral Water Vfx Case Study

By | September 2008
Page 1 of 2
Mount Everest Mineral Water, a Tata enterprise, recently launched the Himalayan brand in its new, international and aspirational avatar. Rediffusion DYR, the creative agency for Himalayan worked on a 60-second TVC with the VFX and post production done by Prime Focus India. The commercial is on air with the complete 60-seconder and shorter versions. The project was significant as it was the first ad created using Prime Focus‘ Indo-US pipeline with the tree sequence being executed at Frantic Films. A total of 19 professionals worked on the advertisement for one-and-a-half months. The advertisement uses VFX extensively to convey the creative theme of ‘going back to nature‘. The TVC was directed by Ravi Udyawar and produced by Kalpana Udyawar of Ravi Udyawar films.

Raj Tambaku, VFX Head, Prime Focus told AnimationXpress.com, "This is the first time that the complete VFX of a TVC - which uses special effects to such a large extent - has been done in India. Besides, the quality and feel of the VFX is of international standards. This was possible due to the trust placed in us by the agency and the Director Ravi Udyawar."

"The Himalayan is obtained from the origin of Ganges. The idea in the creative brief was to take everything back to the original form. In the TVC, the scarf goes to sheep, the shell to the snail and the shirt to the cotton-ball, so on and so forth. We had to make great efforts to get the aesthetics right. It helped that our US arm Frantic Films worked on the complex tree sequence. We had to revert them at certain times but overall the pipeline functioned smoothly," added Raj.

"The Himalayan is obtained from the origin of Ganges. The idea in the creative brief was to take everything back to the original form. In the TVC, the scarf goes to sheep, the shell to the snail and the shirt to the cotton-ball, so on and so forth. We had to make great efforts to get the aesthetics right. It helped that our US arm Frantic Films worked on the complex tree...