High School and Girls Education Unit

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1. INTRODUCTION

South Africa has a high-cost, low-performance education system that does not compare favorably with education systems in other African countries, or in similar developing economies. There is a multitude of well-publicised problems, including a shortage of teachers, under qualified teachers and poor teacher performance. In the classroom, this results in poor learner standards and results, a lack of classroom discipline and is exacerbated by insufficient resources and inadequate infrastructure. On a government level, difficulties have been caused by a failure of appropriate inspection and monitoring, and confusion caused by changing curricula without proper communication and training. All this has lead to massive demoralisation and disillusionment among teachers and a negative and worsening perception of the teaching profession. Majority of learners in South Africa are bi- or multi-lingual, and attends school in a language that is not their first language.

2. INEQUALITIES FACING EDUCATION IN SOUTH AFRICA

2.1 Educational inequalities amongst blacks

Amongst blacks, educational inequality largely follows the lines of income: more affluent Households are better able to support their children through school, implying increasing stratification within black society. Children from the top two black deciles progress Considerably better through the school system than their poorer counterparts and only at age15 start falling behind whites. Private resources were a major factor determining differential black educational outcomes under apartheid. Pupils in Better-off Black households do better in their education, and we find no parallel for Whites. That the education of Blacks but not Whites is constrained by financial resources is further supported by the fact that many Blacks who are not in school (but not Whites). Furthermore, greater recent access to formerly white schools for more affluent blacks may have accentuated qualitative educational differentials amongst blacks.

Data from the 1996 census show mean earnings of full-time employed black workers for whom the educational level of a parent is known, children of the head of household still resident in the household to be substantially higher where the household head has at least matriculated. But is this perhaps solely due to more educated parents having more educated11 children, to differential attainment. In some way the better education of the parent translates into higher earnings for children even Compared to other young workers who also have matriculated, but where the parent had less education. However, it is not clear whether this measures the quality of education, or some other non-observed aspect of human capital transmitted from parents to children. Such premier does decline, though, to about 9% in cases where the children have graduated.

2.2 CHALLENGES FACING FEMALES

Over the years girls education has been given a high level of priority at the highest level. It has been boosted by initiatives, such as free education for girls, President's Empowerment for Girls Education, just to name but a few. However, despite all these incentives, girls education in the country is still faced with a series of challenges. The challenges facing girl’s education include;

➢ early marriages
➢ teenage pregnancy
➢ poverty
➢ peer pressure
➢ low adult literacy
As a result of these factors, it has become very difficult to retain the girl-student in school, especially in the rural areas. Our stand here is that girls must be allowed to finish their education to the highest level, before marrying them off. Parents should be encouraged to desist from such practices as it's not in the interest of the girl child, female students must also be serious and do away with engaging with men until they complete their schooling.  The most common saying among the local people,...
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