High Cost of Tuition

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High Tuition Costs
The cost of tuition for higher education is quickly rising. Over half of college freshmen show some concern with how to pay for college. This is the highest this number has been since 1971 (Marill and O’Leary 64-66, 93). The amount of college graduate debt has been rapidly increasing also. With limited jobs available because of the high unemployment rate, college graduates find themselves staying in debt even longer. However, grants and financial aid are available to students, but students still struggle to pay for their college tuition. Although some claim that higher education is still affordable, higher education costs too much because the state’s revenue is low, the unemployment rate is high, and graduates cannot pay off loans. One reason that higher education is not affordable is that the states’ revenue is low and the states are in debt. Because of their decreasing tax revenues, many states need to make cuts in their budget. As a result of this, tuition is rising and other changes are happening throughout colleges. Some of these changes include: higher student to faculty ratios, less but larger classes, and fewer on-campus jobs that normally support students (Hulsey 24). These changes affect students and impact their view and decisions of certain colleges. The tuition rate has also “been rising at about 6 percent a year for most of the past ten years” (Marill and O’Leary 64-66, 93). This percent inevitably makes it harder for students to find an affordable college. High tuition prices also keep some people from attending their dream college. All of these changes have an effect on the students and the rising tuition prices. Another result of the different states being in debt is that they are giving colleges less financial help. “Prior to the 1980s, most public universities received upwards of 70 percent of their operating budgets from their respective states. Now most receive less than 50 percent” (Hulsey 24). Some schools, such as...
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