Hierarchy of Nursing in Australia

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The word “nurse” comes from the Latin word meaning to nourish or cherish.

Nursing has been a part of our lives since the evolution of mankind. It’s purely taught by Mother Nature, and learned through instinct by men and women, as what the people from the Stone Age did when they nursed their sick families.

Nursing had a historical journey from the beginning. In the early days, witchdoctors and priests would use herbal remedies and prescribed a barbaric act of treatment to nurse the sick because it was believed that they were punished for wrongdoing and had signs of evil spirits.

Around 300 BC, there was a Christian influence that women and men believed they were equal before God. Roman women looked after the sick as God’s earthly work.

In 600 AD, Benedictine monks dedicated to care for the sick as one of their missions and around 1100 - 1200 AD, Charitable institutions were founded to care for sick, poor and old. They were known as faith community nurses who relied on orders from their fellow priests and physicians.

During t he crusades in Europe, 11th Century, some of the earliest organised Nursing hospitals were established by military religious orders staffed by male nurses due to the slaughter of Christians and Muslims.

Between 18th and 19th centuries were considered as the “Dark Ages” of Nursing. Hospitals were badly staffed with Nurses being untrained, had bad characters and low moral standards. Urban health issues such as overcrowding, poor ventilation, poor sanitation and poor hygiene caused many diseases and deaths.

In 1836, Theodor Fliedner, established a Deaconess Institution in Germany called Kaiserwerth, which trained selected women as deaconesses the high standards of nursing to give the best quality of care for the sick. Kaiserwerth’s been a big influence to Modern Nursing and inspired people like Florence...
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