Hhuih

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Hhuih

By | November 2012
Page 1 of 1
he process of taking an idea to law is lengthy, but with a better understanding of how legislation gets passed, residents who are concerned with preserving the environment for generations to come will have a plan of action. In the informative book "From Idea… To Bill… To Law…" by State Senator Randall Grant, the legislative process in Arizona is explained in a step by step process. The first step to know is who governs the Constitution of Arizona, the members of the Senate and the House of Representatives.

There are many areas from which an idea gets brought forth to Congress. The idea must be put into the form of a bill first. A Senator of Representative from the house must sponsor the bill. The bill can stem from numerous sources. Bills can come from the idea of the Sponsor, from state agencies, court decisions, from political subdivisions such as cities or counties, and from businesses and special interest groups. Special interest and private businesses receive the most publicity, but only represent a small portion of new bill ideas.

After the idea has the appropriate support the idea is officially a bill. The bill goes through a series of readings, and then is assigned to a committee for consideration. The bill is discussed in that committee before it is brought forward to the entire Senate. A voice vote is required to pass the bill. If the majority of the voices say "aye" rather than "nay" then the bill is passed into state law (Grant 1-36). There are many sub processes that take place during this process also, but not substantial enough to discuss here. Since we now know the process of getting law pass, it is important to determine the substance of the law and the support behind it.

Local governments should be the first to try and start to clean up their community. The local government should be the first governing agency to be concerned with their home environment and crea