Here Follow Some Verses..

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"Here Follow Some Verses.."

By: Anne Bradstreet

The poem, "Here Follow Some Verses," is very interesting. Many hardships

occured to Anne Bradstreet but she had the courage to get over it by knowing

the truth about God. After the burning of her house, July 10, 1666, Bradstreet

wrote this poem. It expresses her longing for the house and the possesions

that were consumed in the fire.

"I blest His name that gave and took.." This means that she thinks that all

her possessions were worthless. The tone of this poem starts off with Bradstreet

being very attracted to her possesions. She is heartbroken by that all her

valuables are in ashes now. After she questions herself she answers by saying

that her biggest and best rewards was up above, Heaven. After describing all

that she says, "Adieu, adieu, all's vanity." She starts to question herself asking

what anything was worth. Then towards the middle she feels that God has the

right to burn down the house because it was His. Bradstreet describes what her

house looked like after the fire. Also she says how nobody can ever eat at the

table or come to her house again. At the end she is convinced that the only thing

worthy is her acceptance into Heaven and no longer care what the fire took.

"He might of all justly bereft, But yet sufficient for us left." In this portrayal

of her home's destruction, Bradstreet acknowledges her faith by admitting the

right of God to take what has been loaned to her. She states the fire is an act

and the will of God. Her recognition compels a plea to God ("strengthen me in

distress, And not to leave me succorless.") for the capacity to overcome the

helplessness of human existence. Puritans believed human being are born

sinful and remained this way through life. They asserted that destiny did not

exist and therefore there was not certainty as to what the future held for each

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