Help on Erwc

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 132
  • Published : October 25, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
“Going for the Look” Employment Discrimination

The cliché “don’t judge a book by its cover” is hopelessly lost on the people of the younger generation in this modern day. People in general have these subconscious desires to intermingle with others who “look” a certain way. Retail marketing companies such as Abercrombie and Fitch have implemented these emotional impulses as a marketing strategy to the point at which practice has become policy. Marketing is being taken to new heights. In today’s society, not only do companies spend a majority of their money on advertising, but they also use their employees as portable posters. If employees were supposed to be “walking billboards,” then most people would agree that not everyone would be eligible for that particular position. Discrimination is defined as showing favor unjustly. What some corporations are doing today is clearly unjust. People cannot control their appearance completely. Mr. Greenhouse clearly states in his article that hiring certain people that “look great,” is discriminatory and should not occur. That is why the author’s premises are invalid with exceptions, with Mr. Cohen’s analysis. It is a known fact that one cannot sell everything by appearance alone. Mr. Cohen, a senior industry analysis with the NPD Group, stated, “Retailers defend the approach to hiring based on image as necessary and smart, and the industry experts see the point.” Cohen asserts that hiring based on looks is necessary in order to make a profit. He states, that stores have developed new ways to attract the attention of consumers to their brands, by hiring young women who contribute to a store’s sense of style. He concludes that young men are attracted to stores that hire attractive young women and those young men and women are used sex symbols in many retail stores. Every company would love to get by without spending one dime on advertising. This shows that ugly people don’t get hire; companies don’t care about job experiences. They care whether you are attractive or not. Ugly people should be the ones sewing the companies for job discrimination.

With more than 6 billion people, the world has a large variety of human shapes and colors. However, by nature, the human being tends to see others as black, white, yellow, red and brown. As human spread throughout the world, their adaptations to different living conditions and genetic mutations added distinct characteristics to the people. People are supposed be hired based on their ability. For instance, Stephen j. Roppolo, a New Orleans lawyer who represents many hotels and restaurants, stated, “I tell employers that their main focus needs to be hiring somebody who can get the job done.” Hiring for looks is risky from a legal standpoint because even lawyers that represent the businesses are saying that companies should hire based on merit so that they do not get into trouble with the law. Hiring by looks can cause numerous discriminatory lawsuits, both at the government level and the emotional level. Greenhouse states, “if you’re hiring by looks, then you can run into problems of race discrimination, and even disability discrimination.” That being said, you will head on with full of responsibility with the law and might be sued for discriminating the people by their race. Some employers practice blatant forms of minority discrimination by paying lower salaries and other compensation to blacks and Hispanics. Others engage in quota systems by denying promotions and jobs to individuals based on race or color. Federal laws prohibit employers of 15 or more employees from discriminating based on race or color. Virtually all states have even stronger anti-discrimination laws directed to fighting job-related race and minority discrimination. In some states, companies with fewer than eight employees can be found guilty of discrimination. Discrimination affects people all over the world. People of all ethnicities and from all different...
tracking img