Healthcare Reform

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 87
  • Published : April 13, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview

Health Care Reform

It should come as no surprise that the United States’ current health care system is in need of some major changes. Everyone knows that going to the doctor or hospital in the United States can cost a lot of money out of pocket, whether you have insurance or not. Americans who do have insurance pay into it with every pay check, only to go to the doctor and have to pay more. What it would be like to not have to worry about how much money there is in the bank when someone is sick? When a person is ill there are enough things to worry about without having to worry if they can afford the doctor bill. What are some of the pros and cons of a health care reform for the United States?

No one person or company is safe when it comes to the burdens of the rising costs and

decreasing quality of care in our current health care system. “Per-person health care

expenditures in the United States have risen 6.5 percent per year since 2000, and 5.5 percent per

year on average since 1994.” (Furnas, Ben. (January 2009). "American health care since 1994:

the unacceptable status quo". Center for American Progress) Many Americans who do have

insurance are not safe from the rising costs of insurance. “Health care costs burden American

employers, who are forced to cut back on providing coverage and benefits or suffer a competitive

disadvantage against international companies who don't bear health costs.” “Premiums for

employer-provided health care have doubled since 2000.” (Furnas, Ben. (January 2009).

"American health care since 1994: the unacceptable status quo". Center for American Progress)

Due to the recession, many Americans have lost their jobs and are left with no

insurance. There are 46 million Americans with no health insurance. A large number that do

have health insurance are under-insured. Under-insured means that some who have insurance

are not adequately protected from high medical costs. Many people with no or little health

insurance will put off preventative care and even care they may know they need, until it is so bad

that it ends up costing even more money. Individuals with no insurance will end up being

diagnosed in later stages than those with insurance. “Effective chronic disease management and

preventive care have been woefully neglected as a national priority and should be a key piece of

any comprehensive and effective Reform.” (Furnas, Ben. (January 2009). "American health care

since 1994: the unacceptable status quo". Center for American Progress) “Nearly 25% of

uninsured children and 40% of uninsured adults have no regular source of medical care.”

“Inadequate insurance coverage carries with it financial as well as medical risks: the costs of

medical treatment are a leading cause of bankruptcy in the United States” (Oberlander,

Jonathan. (2002). "the U.S. health care system: on the road to nowhere?". Canadian Medical

Association Journal , 67, 163-67. ) As a “great and free” country, we can not sit by and allow

our fellow Americans to be denied medical care simply because of their income. A lot of what is

wrong with the current health care system can be shown in our infant mortality rate. It is fact

that the United States’ infant mortality rates is among one of the highest. The United States

ranks 26th in the world in infant mortality. How one of the largest and most

modernized countries in the world have such a high rate? The answer to that is, it shouldn’t.

A Commonwealth Fund Study found that the United States achieves “an overall score of 65 out

of 100 when comparing national averages with benchmarks of best performance achieved

internationally and within the United States.” It is clear that the United States is coming in well

below the standards of health, efficiency, and care. What would it be like to have a universal...
tracking img