Health, Safety and Welfare in Ecce Setting

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Table of contents:

Aim and Introduction.

Health and safety in ECCE setting.

Health and Safety Policies and Procedures in ECCE Setting.

Well-being of children in ECCE setting.

Characteristic of positive environment in ECCE setting

The factors that contribute to the overall well-being of the children in ECCE setting

Components of a balanced diet for children

Menu sample.

Indoor and Outdoor Safety.

Signs and symptoms of unwell child.
Crèche Safety Check list Sample

Example Risk Assessment for a Crèche

Summary

Evaluation

Recommendations

Bibliography

“The effective functioning of child rearing processes in the family and other child settings requires public policies and practices that provide place, time, stability, status, recognition, belief systems, customs and actions in support of child rearing activities not only on the part of parents, caregivers, teachers and other professional personnel, but also relatives, friends, neighbours, co-workers, communities and the major economic, social and political institutions of the entire society.” (Bronfenbrenner, 1997:38)

Aim and Introduction.

I am going to research the legal requirements related to the ECCE setting, for example: child-staff ratios, health and safety policies etc. I am going to outline the factors that contribute to the overall well-being of the children. I am going to review the components of balanced diet for children in ECCE setting and to create the daily menu for the 2 years old , vegetarian child in full day care setting. I am going to investigate the indoor and outdoor safety in ECCE setting. I am going to familiarise myself with signs and symptoms of an unwell child.

Early Childhood Care and Education services are regulated by legally binding requirements. These are the Pre-school Regulations, which first appeared in 1996 and have been up-dated in 2007. The main purpose of these regulations is to ensure that standards are in place to safeguard the health and welfare of children in pre-school services and to promote their development through the provision of developmentally and culturally appropriate materials, experiences and activities. The regulations affect the full range of group pre-school provisions. All employers and employees are also protected at work by the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005, which imposes duties and responsibilities on both parties to maintain safe practice.

Health and Safety Regulations in ECCE setting.

The law in Ireland provides for the regulation and inspection of pre-school childcare services. Under the Child Care Act 1991 the Health Service Executive (HSE) is charged with ensuring the health, safety and welfare of pre-school children attending services. Pre-school services include pre-schools, play groups, day nurseries, crèches, childminders and other similar services looking after more than 3 pre-school children.

The Child Care Act 1991, Part VII

This provides the legal framework within which regulations can be drawn up for the supervision of pre-school services. The Act sets out two important definitions:

Pre-school child: A child under 6 years of age who is not attending a national school or a school providing an educational programme similar to a national school

Pre-school service: Any pre-school, playgroup, day nursery, crèche, day care or other similar service which caters for pre-school children. This include sessional, full time and drop in services.

The main provisions of the Acts which relate to pre-school services are as follow:

Pre-school care providers are required to notify the HSE that they are providing services

Pre-school providers are required to take all reasonable measures to safeguard the health, safety and welfare of pre-school children attending their services

HSE regions are obliged to supervise and inspect pre-school services

HSE regions are obliged to...
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