Health Records

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Health Records: Transitioning from the Paper Age to the Digital Age The Digital Age has arrived, with digital-based information sharing allowing the care giving part of health care jobs to be just that –care giving—by reducing unwieldy and time-consuming tasks; like documenting. Former president George W. Bush said, “We've got 21st century medical practices, but a 19th century paperwork system...medical electronic records are going to be one of the greatest innovations in medicine (providersedge.com)”. Surely, a new revolution is upon us in the healthcare field—Electronic Health Records (EHRs aka EMRs). Paper documentation has long been the way of keeping medical records, but a transformation to digital medical records has already begun. The development of and need for EHRs is spawned by the many flaws and inconveniences paper documenting comes with, such as: disorganization, charts being too bulky and taking up too much space, charts only able to be handled and written in by one person at a time, illegible handwriting, delays in retrieving stored charts, and new volumes not containing vital, older information. New information technologies give us many opportunities to change this and offer better care as well as maintaining better patient health records. Starting now and even more so in the near future, our medical treatments will be tracked electronically by a federal system. Having electronic medical records at your fingertips, easily transferred to a hospital, is beneficial in many ways and will help avoid duplicate tests and errors. For the purposes of this essay, we will discuss the governmental push behind EHRs, how they are impacting our lives today, and lastly, the future of EHRs. The Bush administration, and now the Obama administration, have both pushed toward e-health records. Obama’s 2009 stimulus package allocated $20 billion for the health care system to start implementing the use of electronic health records everywhere (nytimes.com). They want to...
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