Health Information Exchange

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Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION3
HEALTH INFORMATION EXCHANGE (HIE)3
WHAT IS HIE?3
HISTORY OF HIE4
COMMUNITY HEALTH MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS4
COMMUNITY HEALTH INFORMATION NETWORKS4
IOM REPORTS5
REGIONAL HEALTH INFORMATION ORGANIZATIONS5
HIE TODAY6
BENEFITS OF HIE7
CURRENT CHALLENGES7
ESTABLISHING A BASE OF SUPPORT7
INTERCONNECTING TECHNOLOGY8
ESTABLISHING FINANCIAL LIABILITY AMID UNCERTAINTY8
HIM ROLE IN HIE9
CONCLUSION9
REFERENCES10

Introduction
Consumers today have the ability to access information related to their daily lives or even information related to events happening on the opposite side of the world. However, if this same consumer needed access to his or her personal health information, the ability of the patient or their health care provider to obtain the information would be limited. (Medows) Personal health information is not used to its full potential to support effective and efficient care due to fragmented information creation and storage. Our fast-paced always on the go society calls for a change to this state of isolated, fragmented health information. Whether it be a patient relocated due to a natural disaster or being able to identify a patient who was prescribed a recalled drug, having access to health information no matter where the patient may be is necessary. (Vest and Gamm, 2010) Making health information technology (HIT) will not only enable healthcare consumers access to their own medical history but also ensure that healthcare providers have timely access to medical records, improve the ease and safety of e-prescribing, improve payer reimbursement, and provide the information needed for population based health planning. (Medows) Policy makers, researchers, industry groups, and health care professionals agree that health information exchange (HIE) is the much needed solution. (Vest and Gamm, 2010) Health Information Exchange (HIE)

What is HIE?
The National Alliance for Health Information Technology defines health information exchange (HIE) as the process of sharing patient-level electronic health information between different organizations. This process is conducted in a manner that protects the confidentiality, privacy, and security of the information. (AHIMA, 2012) The ability to exchange health information electronically is the foundation of efforts to improve quality of care, improve patient safety, and reduce costs and thus proves the importance of health information exchange (HIE). (HealthIT) While HIE promises cost and quality improvements, to date there lacks substantial and consistent empirical demonstrations of the effectiveness of HIE. (Vest and Gamm, 2010) History of HIE

Community Health Management Information Systems (CHMISs)
In 1990, the Hartford Foundation initiated community health management information systems (CHMISs) through grants to seven states and cities. (HIT Knowledgebase, 2012) The systems were centralized data repositories that housed patient information. The main purpose of the system was for assessment purposes and to facilitate billing and patient eligibility information retrieval in order to reduce costs. However, none of these systems ultimately survived due to lack of affordable and effective technology. CHMISs occurred prior to the advent of cheap, reliable, high speed internet access. Another major problem included privacy and security concerns from patients and providers brought about by the new idea of collecting personal health information into a single repository. (Vest and Gamm, 2010) Lastly, these systems were unable to transition off grant funding support. (HIT Knowledgebase, 2012)

Community Health Information Networks (CHINs)
By the mid-1990s, community health information networks (CHINs) came onto the scene. CHINs can be considered as the mirror opposite of CHMISs in many ways. They developed in communities interested in the concept of HIE but with commercial endeavors rather than...
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