Health Care in the United States and Affordable Care Act

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C4C Haylie Stanat
POL SCI 211 – T5
14 February 2013

Healthcare in the United States
Michael Tennant, a software developer and writer, questions why we should have the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. “From page 1 to page 906, ObamaCare is chock full of expensive, intrusive, and downright scary programs such as these. The law gives the federal and state governments virtually unlimited power to interfere in Americans' lives, even within the confines of our own homes” (Tennant). This act is often referred to as “Obamacare.” The idea of this act first came up during the Clinton administration. They tried to develop a healthcare system just like “Obamacare” but it never went through. The system is similar and based off of what is happening in Europe, where the government controls the medical care system. Why did they want to start this? The Clinton administration believed too many people were not receiving adequate medical care and coverage. They wanted everyone to have healthcare regardless of their financial means. The socialized healthcare system has been said to intrude on the population’s right to make decisions for what their life requires and also be very costly to the people and the United States as a whole, and Tennant wants to do away with everything regarding “Obamacare”. Tennant points out that this act allows “the US government to expand its reach into the lives of its citizens.” Some of the provisions of the act allow the government home visitations by government agents, possibly including forced immunizations, and “Community Transformation Grants”. These grants are “designed to alter Americans’ lifestyles to conform to the whims of bureaucrats in Washington” (Tennant). This act seems like to Tennant, and many other advocates against Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, another way for the government to intrude on the freedom of its population. Others, like Matt Welch, the editor in chief of Reason magazine, argue there are many...
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