Health Care and Sociological Concepts

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Health Care and Sociological Concepts

"It is health that is real wealth and not pieces of gold and silver." The American Health Care Industry is a very large social institution. The health care is the care, servicers, or supplies related to a person`s health. The three major sociological orientations are functionalist, conflict, and interactions; we will discuss each perspective as it pertains to the health care industry. Functionalism considers each aspect of society is interdependent and contributes to society's functioning as a whole. On the other hand the perspective received criticism that, functionalism does not encourage people to take an active role in changing their social environment, even when such change may benefit them. Instead, functionalism sees active social change as undesirable because the various parts of society will compensate naturally for any problems that may arise. While functionalism focuses on positive aspect of society, which contributes to its stability, the conflict perceptive focuses on the negative and ever-changing nature of society. Conflict theorist encourages social change and believes that rich and powerful people force social order on poor and weak. Critics of the conflict perspective point to its overly negative view of society. The theory ultimately attributes humanitarian efforts, altruism, democracy, civil rights, and other positive aspects of society. The symbolic interactions, directs sociologists to consider the symbols and details of everyday life, what these symbols mean, and how people interact with each other. The American philosopher George H. Mead (1863–1931) introduced this perspective to American sociology in the 1920s. According to the symbolic interactionisms perspective, people attach meanings to symbols, and then they act according to their subjective interpretation of these symbols. Critics of this theory say that, symbolic interactions neglects the macro level of social interpretation—the “big...
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