Health Care and Health Insurance Portability

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There are many pros and cons involved in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996. The first positive is privacy; this act limits a health care provider or insurer to only disclose the minimum necessary information to complete a transaction or medical request. In turn the negative directly affected by this new privacy law is the expense, from legal advice to decipher the confusing terminology of the bill to software compatible with HIPAA. Another con is that now health care providers, insurance providers, and even the consumers are bombarded by overwhelming amounts of paperwork which consume time and money that could be better spent elsewhere. Another positive is that this act enables consumers with pre-existing conditions to obtain group health coverage from an employer without being excluded. Someone can also not be denied coverage for genetically based information. This means that if someone is genetically more likely to get prostate or breast cancer he or she cannot be denied coverage if not diagnosed with the cancer. But on the other hand if you have an emergency visit it is extremely hard to access health care history due to stringent privacy restrictions and the overcautious providers. Given the information, I personally feel that generally HIPAA is a good idea that was taken way too far. There has to be a way to simplify the law and translate it to layman’s terms to eliminate the need for expensive lawyers. With an update for the new software design this will help eliminate the paperwork, lightening the load allowing for employees to do their job.

University of Phoenix. (2006). ARTICLE: Week 3 Electronic Reserve Readings. Retrieved from University of Phoenix, HCA/230-COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR THE HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL website.
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