Hazard Identification

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Hazard identification, risk assessment & risk control in the workplace Purpose

To provide guidance to employers in relation to hazard identification, risk assessment and risk control in the workplace. What is hazard identification, risk assessment, risk control?

Hazard identification is the process used to identify all the possible situations in the workplace where people may be exposed to injury, illness or disease.

"Find it" Risk assessment is the process used to determine the likelihood that people may be exposed to injury, illness or disease in the workplace arising from any situation identified during the hazard identification process.

"Assess it" Risk control is the process used to identify all practicable measures for eliminating or reducing the likelihood of injury, illness or disease in the workplace, to implement the measures and to continually review the measures in order to ensure their effectiveness.

"Fix it"
Why are they important?

As an employer, you have your business objectives as well as moral and legal obligations to provide and maintain a safe and healthy workplace. To effectively manage your business (including health and safety in your workplace) and discharge your moral and legal obligations, it is imperative for:  any potentially hazardous situations (which may cause injury, illness or disease) in your workplace to be identified on an ongoing basis before they occur; the likelihood of each of the hazardous situations occurring to be assessed; if there is any likelihood of occurrence, appropriate measures to prevent their occurrence to be identified and effectively implemented; and the measures to be continually reviewed to ensure their effectiveness.

 



The terms "hazard identification", "risk assessment" and "risk control" are commonly used to summarise the systematic approach for undertaking the above activities for managing workplace health and safety. What does the law require?

The Occupational Health and Safety (Manual Handling) Regulations 1999 require employers to ensure that:

 

any task undertaken, or to be undertaken, by an employee involving hazardous manual handling is identified; an assessment is made to determine whether there is any risk (likelihood of injury, illness or disease) of a musculoskeletal disorder affecting an employee occurring as a result of that task; and any risk is eliminated, or if that is not practicable, reduced so far as is practicable.



The Occupational Health and Safety (Plant) Regulations 1995 require employers to ensure that:  all hazards (potential to cause injury or illness) associated with the installation, commissioning, erection, operation, inspection, maintenance, repair, service and cleaning of plant and associated systems of work are identified; an assessment is made to determine whether there is any risk (likelihood of injury or illness) associated with the identified hazards; and any risk is eliminated, or if that is not practicable, reduced so far as is practicable.





The Occupational Health and Safety (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 1999 require employers to ensure that:  an assessment is made to determine whether there is any risk (likelihood of injury, illness or disease) associated with the use of a hazardous substance at the workplace; and any risk is eliminated, or if that is not practicable, reduced so far as is practicable.



The Occupational Health and Safety (Noise) Regulations 2004 require employers to ensure that:   any risk to employees from exposure to noise is identified; and employees' exposure to noise is controlled so as to minimise risk to health and safety.

The Occupational Health and Safety (Confined Spaces) Regulations 1996 require employers to ensure that:   all hazards (potential to cause injury or illness) associated with work in a confined space are identified; an assessment is made to determine whether there is any risk (likelihood of injury or...
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