Hatshepsuts Reign

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 969
  • Published : April 14, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
The Role of Hatshepsut as a female pharaoh throughout the 18th Dynasty in Egyptian society was vital for the ultimate construction of Egypt as a major imperial power and the overall greatness of Egypt. Hatshepsut’s reign from 1503 BCE to 1482 BCE was one of the most prosperous periods for ancient Egyptian society, the role of Hatshepsut saw a time of great prosperity for the economy and architecture furthermore it was a time of advancement in the arts and of great peace. The great reign of Hatshepsut lasted for twenty-two years, and paved the way for Thutmosis III, who was able to engage in the repossession of the throne. The effective transition from the reign of Hatshepsut to Thutmosis enabled Thutmosis to initiate campaigns of conquest in the East of Egypt, which inturn lead to the establishment of a successful Egyptian Empire.

Hatshepsut contributed significantly to the construction of great monuments, temples statues and also other architectural masterpieces, these offerings to Egyptian society again contributed to the greatness of not only ancient Egypt itself but also to the greatness of Hatshepsut and her success as a female pharaoh. Historian David Bediz elaborates that although other female rulers both preceded and followed her, Hatshepsut’s long and prosperous rule made her one of the greatest female rulers of all time; “She ruled the most powerful, advanced civilisation in the world, successfully for twenty years….Her success stands for all eternity.” The architecture of Hatshepsut was quite unique in a sense that she left her own mark on traditional Egyptian architecture. Historian Naville was quoted “The works of art from her reign, display the imprint of an individual novel taste, which must be none other than that of the divine being who occupied the Horus-throne” (Naville, 1906)

Hatshepsut brought stability to the nation. But by far her defining achievement was her temple at Der-el Bahri known rightfully as the “sublime of sublimes”...
tracking img