Hastiness in Romeo and Juliet

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Hastiness in Romeo and Juliet

Consider the quote: They stumble that run fast.
Illustrate the way in which characters in Romeo and Juliet act in haste and show how this behavior contributes to tragedy.

Introduction:

In Romeo and Juliet, a play written by William Shakespeare set in the ancient Verona, the main characters, in the development of the story, act in hasty ways which contribute to the tragedy of the two lovers.

Body:

A. The party: In fact, already during Act I, Romeo not only agrees with the decision of breaking into a party, but also falls in love with Juliet in a very short time, and this directly contributes to their downfall.

1. “But He that hath the steerage of my course, / Direct my sail! On, lusty gentlemen.” 2. “Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight! / For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.” 3. “Thus from my lips, by yours, my sin is purged.”

B. The balcony scene: Furthermore, during the balcony scene, Juliet becomes also responsible for the tragedy which is about to happen; in fact, after declaring her love’s vow to Romeo, she takes the decision to marry him, and this marriage will become the main cause of their death.

1. “Romeo, doff thy name, / And for that name which is no part of thee / Take all myself.” 2. “If that thy bent of love be honorable, / Thy purpose marriage, send me word to-morrow, / By one that I’ll procure to come to thee, / Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite...”

C. Mercutio’s death: Indeed, also Mercutio becomes one of the motives for the tragedy which befalls onto the two lovers; his decision to fight against Tybalt, in fact, sets on a chain of events that brings Romeo to kill Tybalt, and be banished from Verona, which will determine their unfortunate fate.

1. “(Benvolio:) By my head, here come the Capulets. / (Mercutio:) By my heel, I care not.” 2. “Now, Tybalt, take the villain back again, / That late thou gavest me; for Mercutio’s soul / Is but a little way above our heads, / Staying for thine to keep him company: / Either thou, or I, or both, must go with him.”

D. Juliet’s death: Finally, Juliet’s counterfeited death becomes the cause of the final breakdown of Romeo and Juliet’s love; in fact, after hearing from Blathasar that his love is dead, Romeo decides to commit suicide, and this unfortunate timing will influence the tragedy.

1. “Is it even so? Then I defy you, stars!”
2. “Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you / The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss / A dateless bargain to engrossing death! / Here’s to my love!” 3. “O happy dagger! this is thy sheath; / there rust, and let me die.”

Conclusion:

In final analysis, it’s clear that characters in the play Romeo and Juliet are responsible for its tragedy. They in fact, make hasty decisions, such as breaking into a party, marrying, and fighting against their enemy for no reason, which directly affect and determine the downfall of the pair of star-cross’d lovers.

In Romeo and Juliet, a play written by William Shakespeare set in the ancient Verona, the main characters, in the development of the story, act in hasty ways which contribute to the tragedy of the two lovers. This is particularly evident in four scenes: the scene at the Capulets’ party, the balcony scene, Mercutio’s death, and Juliet’s death. Here the characters, through the power of love, hate, and sorrow, make hasty decisions that directly influence the tragedy which is about to happen. In fact, already during Act I, Romeo not only agrees with the decision of breaking into a party, but also falls in love with Juliet in a very short time, and this directly contributes to their downfall. While in the street during the night, for example, Romeo’s friends take the decision of breaking into the Capulets’ party, and while Romeo at the beginning is not sure it’s a good idea, he then...
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