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Case Study Analysis Paper-Why Didn't We Know?

Table of Contents

Problem Identification…………………………………………………………………………...3

Situation Analysis………………………………………………………………………………..4

Recommendations………………………………………………………………………………..7

References………………………………………………………………………………………..8

Problem Identification:

In the case study Why Didn't We Know, there are a number of problems that the company Galvetrens faced. First, the company's policy for the confidential reporting of misconduct is flawed, and as a result, it leaves employees vulnerable to being retaliated against. Furthermore, this flawed policy leaves the company vulnerable to lawsuits. In the case study, Mike Field, a Galvetren employee, reported to the company’s COOS his concern about possible employee misconduct (Hasson, Hardis, Shear, Rowe, & Robinson 2007). Harry, the COO, then passed the concern to Terry Samples-Mike's boss. Shortly thereafter, Terry demoted Mike stating that the demotion is due to a drop in job performance. Unfortunately for the company, Mike filed a wrongful termination lawsuit alleging his that he was fired due to whistle blowing.

Another problem in the case is that the company had provided inadequate staff training on its newly revised open-door policy. The company's ineffective training and implementation of the new policy meant that employees were unclear on their individual role and responsibilities for responding to and handling alleged misconduct. There appeared to be no clear procedure on the steps that management must take when they receive a complaint of misconduct. This problem was clearly apparent as lower, middle and upper managers all appeared to ineffectively communicate and follow-up with the appropriate parties regarding the misconduct complaint.

Lastly, the company created a new open-door policy that included reporting procedures many employees found to be problematic. In the case, it mentions that the company ignored two of the consulting firm's recommendations- hiring an ombudsman and establishing "a committee of directors responsible for ethic's oversight" (Hasson et al., 2007). The consulting firm made this recommendation based on information it collected through focus groups and interviews of employees. The focus groups and interviews "revealed that many employees would not feel comfortable raising concerns through formal management channels" (Hasson et al., 2007).

Situational Analysis
There are numerous circumstances that led to the misconduct committed by the Galvatrens. The replacement of Galvatrens’ CEO in 1997 led to a dramatic shift in the company’s portfolio as well as its culture (Hasson et al., 2007, 34). While the changes that Chip Brownlee brought to the company as a new CEO led to the expansion of the company’s product portfolio, the cultural changes in the company were incomplete. A review of the events that led to the charges of misconduct indicates inherent flaws in Galvatrens’ policies and norms of conduct. For example, a high turnover in a single department is a warning sign that some form of communication has lapsed. In addition, employees need to become familiar with the company’s communication process; as a newly formed group undergoing the initial group forming stage, board members have to connect to “explore both their personal goals and the group’s goal” (Engleberg & Wynn, 2010, p. 29). The board members have to establish assertive communication practices at the top level of management. Several group discussions to implement a workable plan with accountability standards were determined necessary. With Galvatrens’ lack of a written communication policy available for its employees, other stakeholders were also impacted. For clients not to report Greg Wilson shows a lack trust...
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