Harlem Rough Draft

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"Famous? Make sure you come in the back door."
The Harlem Renaissance was "an explosion of African-American talents and natural born gifts" (Harlem Renaissance: Re-examined 2). Although it was one of the most influential and impacting events when it came to advances in art, literature, entertainment and overall fun, many felt that the Harlem Renaissance itself wasn't so much a celebration of African-American culture, but rather a regurgitation of White principles. But no matter how big the Renaissance was African-Americans were still not accepted into mainstream America.

During the Harlem Renaissance, African-Americans were still discriminated against, even though they had a major impact on society. Even though African-Americans were performers that took part in music, art, literature and theatre, the clubs that catered to "whites only" still refused to let blacks into the clubs unless they were custodians, waiters or cooks. (The Harlem Renaissance 27). African-Americans were allowed to make music for the white people to enjoy, but were not allowed to enjoy it with them. The whites still felt "superior" to the blacks and did not consider them to be equal. The only black people that made it big in the music industry and publishing industry only did so because they appealed to white crowds with their performance tactics, attitudes, and songs of sorrow and upbeat songs to dance to. Even still, black artists were still restricted to certain businesses and areas that would allow them to, regardless of success. (Negro Renaissance 161). No matter how famous they were, blacks were still considered second-class citizens.

The seclusion of African-Americans was not only restricted to those living in the north. The poor Blacks in the South never received any of the racial tolerance up north. They lived in a world of racism and the Ku Klux Klan. The Harlem Renaissance did not redefine African-American expression. This can be seen through the funding dependence on White...
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