Happy Endings Analysis

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Eric M. Dickson
Eng. 1B
Mr. Crosby
16 April 2013

Today a Master, Tomorrow a Novice
There is one thing that everyone non-optionally tries to master; the sense of loss. In a way, not feeling that sense of loss. However, can one become the master to this sense of loss? It is an emotion that defines us as being human. We may become numb to the loss but it is an emotion that is a part of who we are and the way we deal with it is what makes you who you are. Some would say that it is an art to feel nothing. To be unaffected by woe, like art, takes time, practice and patience and is not something easily learned. The title, “One Art”, by itself is quite vague on its own but when examined with context to the poem is quite clever. Art is quite a unique as a word. It has been around for quite sometime now and what art is still cannot be completely pinned down. Like the many views as to what is art there are many different art forms but art in this sense isn’t referring to just the product art. It is the process in which one creates and master’s art, the repetition of it over and over again. Often during this process art is created with powerful emotions behind it. Thus, the title could be read as “One Emotion” since, like the numerous types of art, there are many emotions. The one emotion that the poem is focusing on is the feeling of loss, “The art of losing”(1). The poet uses art as a coping mechanism to deal with the sense of loss. Art is often used this way in to quell the rampaging emotions within a person or in this case to confirm something that they need to come to a realization about, often releasing emotions that had been bottled up. It’s obvious that the poet is forcing them self to write this by the end of the poem. The backbone of the poem, “The art of losing isn’t that hard to master”(1,6,12), has its meaning change as the poem continues on. Rather than being totally straightforward, it becomes more and more ironic, losing its original...
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