Handling Proper Garbage Proposal

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1. Introduction
Hazardous waste is waste that poses a risk to human health or the environment and requires special disposal techniques to make it harmless or less dangerous. Commercial waste is all other waste produced such as paper, cardboard, packaging, flowers and tins.

2. Categories of Clinical Waste
Recommendations as to the categorisation of Clinical Waste are as the Health and Safety Commission “Health Services Advisory Committee (1982)”:- Group A Waste
 Soiled surgical dressings, swabs and all other contaminated waste from treatment areas.
 Waste material (other than linen) from cases of infectious disease where assessment indicates risk to staff handling them
 All human tissue (whether infected or not), animal carcasses and tissues from laboratories and all related swabs and dressings.
Group B Waste
Discarded syringes, needles, cartridges, broken glass, ampoules, cannulas and any other issued disposal sharp instruments.
Group C Waste
Laboratory and post-mortem room waste other than waste included in Group A Group D Waste
Certain pharmaceutical and chemical waste including waste dental amalgam containing mercury.
Group E Waste
Used disposable bed-pan liners, urine containers, incontinence pads, stoma bags and GP bowls. 5
F: H&S Policies/012 Handling & Disposal of Waste Policy & Procedure October 2005
3. Colour Coding and identification for Waste Containers (see pages 10, 11 & 12)
All containers used for clinical and household waste within Hertfordshire Partnership NHS Trust are to conform to the following colour codes, and be separately identifiable
Colour and type of container Type of Waste
Yellow Bag, clearly marked for
Group A Wastes, also Group E wastes, if
Macerator method of disposal is
Yellow Plastic Sharps Containers Group B Wastes marked for incineration Black Plastic Bag General Household Waste, i.e. paper,
packaging, dead flowers, office waste,
bin contents and all aerosols.
Cardboard Box Glass bottles, jars, broken glass. (Broken
glass should be wrapped in paper before
placing in the cardboard boxes. This
includes empty pharmaceutical
Pressurised containers (medicinal Aerosols) must be placed in yellow bags and marked “Contains aerosols”.
All bags must comply with the British Standard Specification 6642 (1985). Yellow clinical waste bags must be sealed by tying at the neck of the bag and affixing the identification tag which is available from the Facilities Department at 99 Waverley Road – telephone number 01727-897797 or fax number 01727-897422 Sharps containers are to comply with BS 7320 (1990) and be of a type approved by the Infection Control Team. All used sharps containers must be incinerated. Sharp containers for disposal must be properly assembled, sealed and secured, and site details must be entered together with the signature and date of assembly and disposal on the box. They should not be filled more than two-thirds. The manager will ensure that numeric tracing can identify the point of origin of all yellow bags and sharp containers.

It is the responsibility of the manager to ensure that their department has sufficient supplies of bags and tags. It is strictly forbidden to borrow or use tags issued to another ward, department or site. Staff have been instructed not to collect yellow bags without identification tags. 6

F: H&S Policies/012 Handling & Disposal of Waste Policy & Procedure October 2005
4. Means of Segregation
Group A Waste to be placed in yellow clinical waste storage container/bag at the point of generation.
The container/bags are to be removed at least daily (or when three-quarters full for a bag or two-thirds full for containers) and to be taken to the Separate Clinical Waste Storage Area in the vicinity of the ward or department.

It is the responsibility of all staff to ensure that each yellow bag is secured with a separate...
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