Han China and Imperial Rome

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Even though, both the Han Dynasty (206-220 CE) and the Imperial Roman Empire (31 BCE- 476 CE) became the strongest empires of their time, they differend in achieving that goal through their political systems, which were centered around their governemnts. Imperial Rome and Han China formed distinctive methods of social and political control. To Chine, the centerpiece that supervised everything was knows as Confucianism. With all dependability focused on the emperor and society serving as a family unit, Han China's political system was known for a centralized, closed unit. It was ruled by an emperor who took the Mandate of Heaven in deep consideration. The Han developed a supply of soilders, which kept their borders secured and made them capable to exchange with others from time to time. On the other hand, Rome had a centralized, mingled structure. The main focus points of the Roman Society were operated by a Roman Monarchy, which was disguised as a Republic, who controlled their complex structure. The Roman Society had more residents and rights than the Hans, Roman's political control lay in the hands of the wealthy, which then they were elected to a political seat. The govenors were picked from family networks. The only way Romans could accomplish anything big in a certain time span was to make strong changes in their community. It was an enormous weight on Rome's resources and power, when they had to stress over big wins. For example, when there was barely any food to support the developing empire. The Romans and the Hans both had their wealthiest people control over their peasants, which caused a social distribution to each and every one, and could-of leaded to outbrakes in little battles, wars between the communities, and what not. This was enitrely not beneficial on each empire's part and especially their social interaction.
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