Hamlet

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In Hamlet, Shakespeare uses crude diction and immoral similies to accentuate Hamlet’s duality of human nature as revneger. O vengeance!
Why, what an ass am I! This is most brave, That I, the son of a dear father murdered, Prompted to my revenge by heaven and hell, Must, like a whore, unpack my heart with words And fall a-cursing like a very drab, A scullion!

(II, ii, line 594-200)

Shakespeare manipulates the juxtaposition of animal references to display Hamlet’s duality of human nature. Hamlet refers to himself as stupid and foolish by calling himself an “ass.” Or more commonly known as a donkey. A donkey has been thought of as unintelligent, stupid, and silly throughout the ages. In the bible, an ass has been signified as the understanding in man and truth. The asses carry burdens through out the bible and carries truth and good or falsity and evil. Hamlet is stuck between the good and evil. Hamlet has been procrastinating in the sense the he has not took action against the king. Hamlet has speculated the situation though he torn between the good and bad. Hamlet continues his crude diction to display his human duality. Hamlet refers to his father as “dear.” The definition of “dear” is brave, bold, strenous, glorious, noble, and honorable. Each one of these words is how Hamlet sees his father. His fathers was dressed in his war gear when he saw him, which radiates bravery and nobility. Theses traits transmits to the symbolism of a deer. Heads of deer appear on the walls of hunters as a symbolism of bravery and power. Hamlet still sees his father in a good light even though he is angery that he has changed his detiny. The juxtaposition of these animals shows how Hamlet is is weak with no action instead of brave and honorable....
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