Haitian and French Revolution

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Both the French and Haitian revolutions were spurred for similar reasons by distressed people, with an unfair distribution between social classes, restricted liberties and also a large gap between the rich and the poor which was the main impulse. There were significant overall economic differences between Haiti and France before the revolutions occurred. France was nearly bankrupt by the time that the revolution began and the American revolution had been extremely costly for France. The large economic ache on France caused abundant pain on France and cause heavy taxation of the bottom social class. In contrast, the economy of Haiti was not a factor that fueled the Revolution. The Haitian economy was flourished. Free labor from slaves created a excess of goods. The social class situations of Haiti and France were the main causes of both revolutions. The Haitian social class system was particularly flaky because it was based on race. The French system was also very stratified and consisted on the lower class. A meager of the people had privileges, comfort, and luxury while the majority if people suffered. The lowest class of each society realized that their strength in numbers of their cause. The third estate broke Free from France and created the Declaration of the Rights of Man. This document outlined a set of rights that pertained to every man from any social class. From there, the third estate moved forward in taking the country. The Haitian slaves overthrew their oppressors. Francias Toussaint Loverture was the leader of the revolution and was a big factor in how they defeated the Europeans. The slave revolution was not just a clash in Social classes, but also a clash between races. Unlike the French Revolution, the two sides of the Haitian revolution were racially different.
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