Hacking

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Hacking

Contents ~~~~~~~~
This file will be divided into four parts:

Part 1: What is Hacking, A Hacker's Code of Ethics, Basic Hacking Safety Part 2: Packet Switching Networks: Telenet- How it Works, How to Use it, Outdials, Network Servers, Private PADs

Part 3: Identifying a Computer, How to Hack In, Operating System Defaults
Part 4: Conclusion- Final Thoughts, Books to Read, Boards to Call, Acknowledgements

Part One: The Basics ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
As long as there have been computers, there have been hackers. In the 50's at the Massachusets Institute of Technology (MIT), students devoted much time and energy to ingenious exploration of the computers. Rules and the law were disregarded in their pursuit for the 'hack'. Just as they were enthralled with their pursuit of information, so are we. The thrill of the hack is not in breaking the law, it's in the pursuit and capture of knowledge. To this end, let me contribute my suggestions for guidelines to follow to ensure that not only you stay out of trouble, but you pursue your craft without damaging the computers you hack into or the companies who own them.

I. Do not intentionally damage *any* system. II. Do not alter any system files other than ones needed to ensure your
escape from detection and your future access (Trojan Horses, Altering Logs, and the like are all necessary to your survival for as long as possible.) III. Do not leave your (or anyone else's) real name, real handle, or real

phone number on any system that you access illegally. They *can* and will track you down from your handle! IV. Be careful who you share information with. Feds are getting trickier.

Generally, if you don't know their voice phone number, name, and occupation or haven't spoken with them voice on non-info trading conversations, be wary. V. Do not leave your real phone number to anyone you don't know. This

includes logging on boards, no matter how k-rad they seem. If you don't know the sysop, leave a note telling some trustworthy people that will validate you. VI. Do not hack government computers. Yes, there are government systems

that are safe to hack, but they are few and far between. And the government has inifitely more time and resources to track you down than a company who has to make a profit and justify expenses. VII. Don't use codes unless there is *NO* way around it (you don't have a

local telenet or tymnet outdial and can't connect to anything 800...) You use codes long enough, you will get caught. Period. VIII. Don't be afraid to be paranoid. Remember, you *are* breaking the law. It doesn't hurt to store everything encrypted on your hard disk, or keep your notes buried in the backyard or in the trunk of your car. You may feel a little funny, but you'll feel a lot funnier when you when you meet Bruno, your transvestite cellmate who axed his family to death. IX. Watch what you post on boards. Most of the really great hackers in the

country post *nothing* about the system they're currently working except in the broadest sense (I'm working on a UNIX, or a COSMOS, or something generic. Not "I'm hacking into General Electric's Voice Mail System" or something inane and revealing like that.) X. Don't be afraid to ask questions. That's what more experienced hackers

are for. Don't expect *everything* you ask to be answered, though. There are some things (LMOS, for instance) that a beginning hacker
shouldn't mess with. You'll either get caught, or screw it up for others, or both. XI. Finally, you have to actually hack. You can hang out on boards all you
want, and you can read all the text files in the world, but until you actually start doing it, you'll never...
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