Hacking

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 31
  • Published : April 16, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Topic area : Computer Crime (Crime Fighting Versus Privacy and Civil Liberties) CISPA, the Privacy-Invading Cyber security Spying Bill, is Back in CongressIt’s official: The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act was reintroduced in the House of Representatives yesterday. CISPA is the contentious bill civil liberties advocates fought last year, which would provide a poorly-defined "cyber security" exception to existing privacy law. CISPA offers broad immunities to companies who choose to share data with government agencies (including the private communications of users) in the name of cyber security. It also creates avenues for companies to share data with any federal agencies, including military intelligence agencies like the National Security Agency (NSA).EFF is adamantly opposed to CISPA. Will you join us in calling on Congress to stop this and any other privacy-invasive cyber security legislation?As others have noted, “CISPA is deeply flawed. Under a broad cyber security umbrella, it permits companies to share user communications directly with the super-secret NSA and permits the NSA to use that information for non-cyber security reasons. This risks turning the cyber security program into a back door intelligence surveillance program run by a military entity with little transparency or public accountability.” Last year, CISPA passed the House with a few handfuls of amendments that tried to fix some of its vague language. But the amendments didn't address many of the significant civil liberties concerns. Those remaining problems were reintroduced in today's version of CISPA. Here's a brief overview of the issues:Companies have new rights to monitor user actions and share data—including potentially sensitive user data—with the government without a warrant.First, CISPA would still give businesses the power to use "cyber security systems" to obtain any "cyber security threat information" (CTI)—which could include personal communications—about a perceived...
tracking img