Haccp Audit Pillars Restaurant

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  • Topic: Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points, Food safety, Food
  • Pages : 5 (1201 words )
  • Download(s) : 126
  • Published : November 30, 2011
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HACCP Audit Pillars Restaurant


This study was to audit the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) procedures in Pillars restaurant. The investigation was done on the 18th of November. Main findings indicate that Pillars kitchen does practice HACCP procedures that insure food safety. However at delivery of goods and storage there were no records of temperature checks of the fridges nor was there any records available of probing at delivery. Furthermore some of the food prepared in pillars restaurant is prepared by other training classes, these are sometimes first years that just started and lack experience and in some cases even have not obtained their food safety certificates. The recommendations are that more care should be taken when receiving goods and all temperatures should be checked. In addition more accurate temperature checks are required in the stores.

Contents Page

1. Introduction1
2. Methodology: HACCP2
3. Findings3
4.1. Delivery and storage3
4.2 preparation3
4.3 cooking process3
4. Conclusions4
5. Recommendations4

List of Figures and tables

A1: Stores temperature checks

A2: High risk food Probed

1. Introduction

Pillars restaurant is the schooling ground for chefs at the London school of hospitality and tourism. It’s open to public from Monday to Friday with lunch and recently open on Thursday evening for dinner. This report aims to audit the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) procedure of the kitchen in Pillars restaurant. The main prominence of the audit covers temperature checks at Critical Control Points (CCP) which are the delivery, storage, preparation and cooking process. The food at pillars is often produced fresh on the day with ingredients being supplied by the store located in the university which operates using nominated and evaluated suppliers. However at times food produced by training classes is sold at Pillars as well. Pillars restaurant is run by students with a variety of skill levels. This report strives not to examine any human behavior. Based on facts gathered on the audit and further research the appropriate suggestions and recommendations are presented.

2. Methodology: HACCP

The point of the HACCP procedure is to classify potential hazards during food preparation and categorize them into critical control points. This is to control bacterial growth to guarantee food safety (Stretch & Southgate 1991). The Origins of HACCP date back to the early 1960s, developed by Pilsbury and NASA to ensure food safety for astronauts in outer space (Sprenger 2005). However only since 2006 it has been law for all food businesses to have a food safety management system in place. Defined by Codex Alimentarius (latin for “Book of Food”) HACCP can be divided into 7 Principles (cited by Sprenger 2005); 1. Constructing a flow diagram that outline the control measures – Hazard Analysis. 2. Determining the Critical Control Points (CCPs).

3. Setting up critical limits.
4. Setting up monitoring systems for each CCP.
5. Setting up protocols for appropriate actions when CCPs are violated. 6. Setting up Procedures that confirm the HACCP routine is functioning properly 7. Finally keeping documents and recordings of all procedures: Due diligence In order to set up a functioning HACCP procedure all food handlers must receive a food safety training.

In practice this is roughly what a HACCP control chart should look like (Foskett & Paskins 2005): Nominated supplier
who have been assessed or/and nominated

Check: use by, best before date, product temperatures, condition of delivery vehicle.

Daily temperature monitoring

Thorough cooking to core temp. off 70°C

Storage above 63°C or below 5°C temp. checks.

Goods – Receipt Deliveries
Goods – Storage
Cooking Process
Holding at point of dispense

3. Findings

In general, the...
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