Gun Control

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Gun Control, Why Too Much Is Bad

Gun Control, Why Too Much Is Bad

Controlling access to firearms will not make shootings happen less frequently. While the media prefers to report and sensationalize the shootings committed by 'loners who kept to themselves until they finally snapped', the average gun violence incident happens among the already present criminal element. Therefore, taking firearms out of the hands of law-abiding citizens will not only do nothing about criminal access to such weapons, but will rob otherwise honest and forthright citizens from being able to defend themselves from such villainy with equal measure. Gun control is vital, but not to the point of over control. Having the rights to our 2nd amendment is vital and increasing control won’t stop violence and taking away those rights will cause more violence. We as humans are prone to violence and predation (without the eating part) on one another simply because of our brain size and how we evolved.

Humanity, not just Americans, has a fixation with violence. We are natural omnivores who achieved our brain size due to a combination of scavenging from other predators' kills and a healthy dose of predation ourselves. Higher brain size requires a higher level of aggressiveness in a species in general. This is amplified by being a highly social species that competes with itself for territory. Further, human aggression against members of its' own species has a storied history: it's called *Human History*. We have a long tradition of treating others like so much offal when it comes to keeping our individual or small collective best interests at the top of the theoretical totem pole, either justified as nationalism, 'Manifest Destiny/Right to Hegemony', or simple avarice. Think what you will, ecological hardship made primates of the genus Homo an acquisitive family capable of thinking ahead for perceived future scarcity, and willing to use said foresight for, but more commonly against, others of its' own. To that end, we, as a species, are highly inclined to resort to violence for instinctual reasons. Trying to program that out of our genome is more difficult than sending a man to Pluto and expecting him to come back sane with present technological capacities. A pointless and impossible effort on anyone’s part to try and attempt in regards to altering how we evolved throughout history. However society as a whole has never acted kindly on gun violence anyway. The first guns were made as weapons of war, but were not entirely practical for that. Earliest guns were fashioned into the all too familiar fashion of cannons. Better metallurgy led to making guns smaller and lighter, and eventually resulted in the shoulder-fired arms such as muskets and blunderbusses. Now we have handheld weapons that can destroy vehicles and level buildings. With this in mind it is a no brainer why vengeful people would seek retaliation with a firearm, and because of military advancements it is why people look at guns with disdain. Adding this with the fact there are hundreds of thousands if not millions of people who have little to no training in weapon safety which can lead to horrible acts like school shootings.

When it comes to the news or any other media, relaying information is absolutely atrocious. To quote Rolf Dobelli, “Our brains are wired to pay attention to visible, large, scandalous, sensational, shocking, people related, story-formatted, fast changing, and loud, graphic onslaughts of stimuli. Our brains have limited attention to spend on more subtle pieces of intelligence that are small, abstract, ambivalent, complex, slow to develop and quiet, much less silent. News organizations systematically exploit this bias.”(“Avoid News Towards a healthy Diet”). That in and of itself is true, you see this everyday in the news. All the news media does in this day in age is to capitalize on the downfalls of anyone and anything. Not too often does a good, heartwarming...
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