Gulliver's Travels

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Gulliver’s travels is a book full of allusions to society during the days of Jonathan Swift, as well as things before him. Swift was a very satirical writer from Ireland who didn’t care for the British very much at all. His viewpoints toward the British can be seen in Gulliver’s travels, as well as his attitude towards different aspects of society. One thing Swift did not like about England and much of the rest of the world was its ridiculous bureaucracy. When Gulliver is interacting with the Lilliputians, everything is done by some official edict. At one point, A messenger brings the Lilliputian king a message, but not before telling someone else, so that person could tell someone else, and finally that person could tell the king. Swift uses this to show how inefficient a bureaucracy can be, and how sometimes the “proper procedure” may not be the best way for everything. During his stay with the Lilliputians, Gulliver discovers that they have been fighting a war with Belfescuans. After asking for the reason of the war, Gulliver discovers that it is because of each groups preferences in the art of cracking eggs. While these disagreements are much more miniscule than the ones that came over Europe in Swift’s time, it is a reference to the disagreements between different Christian religions at the time. When cracking an egg, you end up with the same product ( a cracked egg ) no matter how you crack it. Just like the eggs, no matter which Christian doctrine you chose to follow, you would end up at the same heaven, with the same god. Later in the novel, Gulliver arrives in the kingdom Brobdingnag. While he is here, he is question by the queen of the nation on where he is from. He replies by saying he is from England, and begins to speak of England highly, but without giving any actual reason behind his claims. When the queen asks him, the reasons he gives only make England look worse. Still though, he is persistent that England is the best place on the planet. Here,...
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