Groups, Teams, and Conflict

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Team Plan – Riordan Manufacturing
Holly Lopez
MGT 311
University of Phoenix
September 20, 2012
Rocco Natale

At Riordan Manufacturing, we are preparing for an exciting new segment of production to meet the needs of the expanding medical technology industry. The news that CardiCare Valve heart valves will be produced in our customs plastic-injection facility in Pontiac, Michigan was released last week. We look forward to developing a long-term relationship with the CardiCare brand. New teams will be formed to begin work on CardiCare production beginning next period. Many of our seasoned employees will be joining CardiCare production teams, and this production segment also marks a new phase of job creating and hiring. “We will maintain an innovative and team oriented working environment. By assuring that our employees are well informed and properly supported, we will provide a climate focused on the long term viability of our company,” (University of Phoenix Material, Virtual Organizations). Team building and training will begin immediately.

To construct the teams effectively, we reviewed many team creation strategies. Bringing a fresh perspective to these teams is important because this marks our first involvement in the medical industry. We want this to be a reflection of our team creation strategy. Precision, quality, and durability are key factors in the success of our relationship with CardiCare. With that in mind, our team creation strategy will be different than any we have used before.

The first team strategy we reviewed was a Leadership Creation strategy. This is close to our traditional team creation strategy, putting our senior members in charge of subordinates’ action, monitoring, and reporting. The strengths of this strategy are channeled communication, consistent reporting, and development of a standardized process. Weaknesses include possible loss of motivation by subordinates and decline in quality control. Because we must keep quality high and production consistent, this strategy will not be our focus.

The second team strategy we reviewed was Team Efficacy approach, in which we would build upon the team members’ knowledge and conviction of their value and worth to the CardiCare product. The strengths here would be short-term intrinsic motivators, sense of pride, and a utilitarian-type perspective of significance and achievement. This would be a challenge for leaders to maintain after the initial phases of production. Our production team members are already aware of the implications of producing medical-grade products. We also visited a strategy based of Role Definition. This would be great for consistent quality in every team. It would allow us to develop new associates specifically for the job they will be performing. Every member would know what is expected of them, and what standards they must meet. The drawbacks from this plan could include major productivity loss if employees did not report to work every day as scheduled. Reports and performance evaluations may then be counterproductive to motivation if roles are not adjustable.

A Team Diversity creation strategy would be a strong option for our company. We are blessed with a diverse base of employees, and the creativity brought to past teams by diversity has boosted efficiency. The need for efficiency is intact, but the need for creativity may not be. Acceptable production variation or margins of error are extremely slim with this production line.

A Goal Setting team strategy may be the best option for the production of the CardiCare Valves. This strategy will allow the members to set individual and teams goals, and maximize intrinsic and extrinsic motivators. Weakness of this strategy comes in the form of increased responsibility for the team leaders, whom will require more company time and resource to identify and build-in individual team members’ motivators and goals. Production in this...
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