Group Proposal

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Learning with ADHD 1
Running Head: Learning with ADHD

Learning with ADHD: Group Proposal
Group Counseling and Psychotherapy
1246 PineCrest Ave
Hagerstown, Md. 21740
Telephone: 240-217-7757
Instructor: Tina Pone

Learning with ADHD 2
The Journey: Learning with ADHD.
Children with ADHD are in need of a group that will help to improve their academic functioning. This group would be important for children with ADHD because those with ADHD have significant impairment in multiple domains of functioning. “The most problematic is academic impairments because children with ADHD will most likely be retained, placed in special education, and drop out of school than their peers. They often will forget to complete assignments, complete assignments but forget to turn in the assignment, and make careless mistakes in their work” (Langberg, Epstein, Urbanowicz, Simon, & Graham, 2008, p. 401). Also, children with ADHD will display off tasks, impulsive, and disruptive behaviors in the classroom (Langberg, Epstein, Urbanowicz, Simon, & Graham, 2008). Also, Raggi and Chronis (2006) state that academic difficulties for children with ADHD include failure to complete homework, poor comprehension of material, poor study skills, low test and quiz grades, poor preparation for class, disruptive behavior, peer conflict, and conflict with teachers. If ADHD is left untreated then this can seriously interfere with a child’s social interactions with peers and teachers, academic achievement, and overall school experience (Leslie, Lambros, Aarons, Haine, Hough, 2008). Deficits in organizational skills may contribute to these academic impairments, as children with ADHD frequently loose assignments, misplace their completed work, and have difficulty planning for tests (Langberg, Epstein, Urbanowicz, Simon, & Graham, 2008). Also, one of the most common characteristics exhibited by children with ADHD is chronic underachievement relative to their intellectual abilities. For example, studies evaluating underachievement have found that up to 80% of children with ADHD exhibit academic Learning with ADHD 3

performance or learning problems, more than 50% may require academic tutoring, and between 40% and 50% will eventually receive services in special education programs. Also overall achievement test scores of children with ADHD frequently fall below those of their typically achieving peers on core academic subjects, including measures of reading, spelling, and math (Trout, Lienemann, Reid, & Epstein, 2007). Group Setting

The setting of the group would be during school hours in a classroom that is not being used. Objectives/Goals
The objectives of the group would be for the students: (1) to learn what ADHD is, (2) to learn how it impacts school performance, and (3) to learn how the symptoms are manifested in school (Webb & Myrick, 2008). The goals of the group would be for the students to improve their academic and social functioning in school, to help the students learn more effectively and efficiently (Webb & Myrick, 2008), and for the students to improve their behavior in the classroom. Literature Review

ADHD is one of the most commonly diagnosed childhood disorders with three to seven percent of grade-schoolers being diagnosed (Langberg, Epstein, Urbanowicz, Simon, & Graham, 2008).

Learning with ADHD 4
Definition of ADHD
Smith, Pelham, Evans, Gnagy, Molina, et al (1998) defines ADHD as a heterogeneous disorder. They also state that children with ADHD will continue to exhibit the symptoms of ADHD such as inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity when they are adolescents (Smith, Pelham, Evans, Gnagy, Molina, et al, 1998). Langberg, Epstein, Urbanowicz, Simon, and Graham (2008) define ADHD as a developmentally inappropriate symptom of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Weieneth, Harvey, Youngwirth, and...
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