Group Membership

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Group Membership
Working in groups may have many different types of outcomes. A study done by Mark Levine and Simon Crowther did four different studies on how group membership and group size promote behavior. Maybe depending on whom you may work with. The four different studies that they used to evaluate how, group size, social categorization, and bystander behavior differs from each other. I think in all the studies number one is the most important. It states that bystanders in the same group who may be strangers may have a harder more difficult time getting through the project although if the group is made up of all friends they seem to be able to get through the project a lot easier. Whether at work or just in a classroom you may be set with this task. Usually when you are asked to pick a group or you are given one you always hope to be with your friends because you know that it’s a lot easier and more comfortable for you to communicate with them. I once went through study number one when I was a junior in high school. My class was given a project that was due in two weeks and the groups were given to us and I was with all people who I didn’t know. We spent a whole week doing nothing. We never communicated; never saw each other out of class, because we were so uncomfortable with each other. So after a week of nothing I asked my teacher if I could move groups to a group that had more of my because my group wasn’t getting anything. After I moved groups I noticed a big difference, my group was getting through it with no trouble. We were able to text, go to each other’s house and meet after school to finish the project.
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