Grendel Comparison

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An individual often comes to the realization that the written version of a story and its visual coefficient often differ dramatically. The context and organization of the pieces may differ entirely and often editors of these arts are attempting to allude to a certain point. The way Grendel is portrayed in the Anglo-Saxon tale of Beowulf and its counterpart Grendel , exemplifies the differences in point of view. The character of Grendel is contrasted severely in these two texts as well as the visual illustration. The inconsistencies come in the form of physical appearance, actions, perspective, and portrayed roles. In the epic poem, Beowulf, Grendel is portrayed as a monster who is terrorizing Hrothgar’s people. The point of view has great impact on the portrayal of Grendel as a horrendous monster because it is coming directly from his opposing force. The tale is told from Beowulf’s perspective who believes that Grendel is the root to all evil. “That shepherd of evil, guardian of crime” as Beowulf describes him is significant. These kennings show that the battle is not just between man and monster, but between forces of good and evil. In Beowulf’s point of view, Grendel is not just evil himself, but is a source and caretaker of evil. The monster’s thoughts were as quick as his greed of his claws: he slipped through the door and there in the silence snatched up thirty men, smashed them unknowing in their beds, and ran out with their bodies, the blood dripping behind him, back to his lair, delighted with his night’s slaughter,” this quote embodies the fear that the Danes had for Grendel. Grendel’s actions and how he is viewed by the humans gives the reader great detail about his character. Grendel is feared by humans because of his raids. After a raid, the Danes are left wondering when he will come back and what he will do. This is significant because it describes the mysterious and dark side of Grendel’s character. In this excerpt from Beowulf the author uses a...
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