Green Strategies

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Quarterly DOE Update on Environment, Development & Sustainability

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Issue 3 / 2010

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doe.gov.my

Spearheading a Green Culture

Malaysia’s Strategic Green Initiatives
During the rise of Western Europe in the 18th century, the dominant theme of that era was Industrial Revolution. It was a groundbreaking theme that revolutionalised Western economies, socio-economic thoughts and contributed to the creation of the term economies of scale in the Western hemisphere. Today, the theme has been gradually substituted by the theme Green Revolution which appears to have penetrated almost all sectors of global economies. This occurred consequent to global warming warnings and international environmental efforts carried out by the United Nations and concerted environmental NGOs worldwide.

COMMITMENT TO INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS
The United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) represent an international environmental movement which seeks to achieve eight goals for a better world. One of these goals is to ‘Ensure Environmental Sustainability’ (Goal 7). Target 7.A strives to ‘integrate the principles of sustainable development into country policies and programmes and reverse the loss of environmental resources’, while Target 7.B hopes to ‘reduce biodiversity loss, through achieving, by 2010’ a significant reduction in the rate of loss. Goal 7 is currently being observed and implemented by Malaysia via its green initiatives, to a large extent including all practical measures executed in the implementation stages of the Millennium Development Goals.

The National Green Technology Policy (NGTP) was launched to address the following four main areas of concern: (i) Energy, (ii) Environment, (iii) Economy and (iv) Social Aspects. Under the NGTP, five main objectives have been defined and have been described in previous issues. The Policy remains a hurdle as Malaysia relies 62.6% on gas, 20.9% on coal within the Malaysian National Grid infrastructure2 and a measly 9.5% on hydropowerbased sources. The remaining 7% is expected to be drawn from renewable energy resources. This is of grave environmental concern. Malaysia’s Strategic Green Initiatives From the desk of the Director General Green Alternatives for Better Living Green Technology and Green Economy Versus Green Washing Green Computing: Improving Energy Efficiency and Reducing Waste Green Banking: Reducing Indirect Environmental Costs

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THE NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY
The National Energy Policy calls for meaningful research and development of critical mass energy3, which includes nuclear-based energy. It is therefore highly ironical to note that unless there is a better Renewable Energy (RE) option4, nuclear energy will be anticipated to drive Malaysian energy growth into the next phase of economic advancement by year 2020. The proposal by Malaysia to incorporate the nuclear energy5 factor as another alternative to current domestic energy demands an anti-thesis towards ASEAN’s aspirations to achieve environmental sustainability as reflected in the ASEAN Plan of Action on Science and Technology: 2007-20116 and the wider expectations under the UN Millennium Goals. Continued on page 3

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THE NATIONAL GREEN TECHNOLOGY POLICY: AN UPDATE
In Malaysia, the government has taken cognisance of Goal 7 above and international green efforts. In April 2009, a new Ministry was established, the Ministry of Energy, Green Technology and Water (KeTTHA)1. The primary objective of KeTTHA is to promote high impact research and development (R&D) of green technologies in Malaysia. The Green Technology Financing Scheme was set up by the government towards this end.

Greening Tourism: Moving Towards Responsible Tourism 12 Can Biochar Mitigate Climate Change? Event Highlights

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A publication of the Department of Environment, Malaysia - FREE

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Spearheading a Green Culture
Green is the colour of the next...
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