Greek God: Apollo

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Born on the sunny island of Delos, Apollo was one of the most important of the twelve gods in Greek mythology. He was associated with many essential things including; the arts (poetry, art, dance, and music), medicine and healing, the sun, truth, law, and knowledge and philosophy. He was the son of the Greek god Zeus, and nymph Leto. His siblings included his twin sister Artemis; the god of hunting and wilderness. He is depicted as an ideal handsome athletic youth, with curly blonde hair, that had many male and female lovers. Although he had no success in marriage due to his arrogance, Apollo had four children named; Cyrene Aritaeus, Callipe Orpheus, Heccuba Troilius and Cornonis Asclepuis. Apollo had several enemies including; Python, Marsyas, and Tityus; most of which he ended up killing. The lyre or bow in Apollo’s hands, and a laurel wreath on his head, were some symbols relating to him. The raven and python were common animal representations of Apollo. He is also associated with the sun. Apollo even has a constellation named after him in Latin called Ophiuchus, meaning “serpent holder.” For Greeks, the snake was a symbol of medicine; this represents him as he was the god of healing. There were many myths relating to this god, including an occurrence where a satyr by the name of Marsyas challenged Apollo to a music contest. This was judged by the Muses, who were thought to be “the source of knowledge and an inspiration to the creation of the arts.”Numerous endings have been made through this myth, a common ending being Apollo winning with music played with his lyre, in comparison to Marsyas and his double flute. Being the winner, he was proclaimed the god of music.
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