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Greece: The Greek World 500-400BC The Ionian Revolt

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Greece: The Greek World 500-400BC The Ionian Revolt

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Ionian Revolt occurred in 499BCThe Ionian Revolt was the first round in the struggle between Greece and PersiaThe Greeks of Asia Minor revolted against Persian controlGreeks had been subject to Persia since 545BCHerodotus ViewsHerodotus believes the direct cause of the revolt as simply the ambitions and intrigues of the tyrant of Miletus (Aristagoras) and his father-in-law (Histiaeus)Herodotus does not take into account the widespread discontent throughout the Greek cities of Asia Minor which had existed from 545BC when they became subject to PersiaAristagoras of Miletus could not have stirred up a rebellion of disunited Greek communities if they had not already been unhappy with their situationUnderlying CausesThere are many underlying causes of the revolt which Herodotus does not exploreThe Greeks had lost their autonomy and independence in deciding their own lifestyleThe Greeks were subject not only to another power, but an oriental barbarian king to whom they were forced to pay heavy tributeThe heavy tribute the Greeks paid to the king was mostly not returned into local circulationThe Persian system of local government in Asia Minor involved the use of Greek pro-Persian tyrants who were puppets of the great kingThese Greek puppet tyrants held their position through the support of the satrap to whom they were responsibleTyranny had become a common form of government in Greece and Asia Minor when Cyrus conquered those areasIn the generation which followed most states had overthrown their tyrants and tyranny was no longer acceptable to the GreeksIn order to free themselves from tyranny they had to rebel against the Persian king who controlled themThe Greeks needed leadership and direction as they lacked unityDirect CauseHistiaeus (tyrant of Miletus and successful commander under Darius) was summoned to Susa and detained indefinitely by the king who suspected his ambitionsIn Histiaeus place at Miletus he left his son-in-law (Aristagoras)When Aristagoras was...