Great Scarf of Birds

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The Great Scarf of Birds
Poetry is structured in several different ways. Much of the author’s way of writing converges the reader into knowing how to interpret the writing. John Updike is on an artificial man-made field (the golf field), and this foreshadows his eventual realization of his detachment from nature. He is playing at Cape Ann in October, and analyzes the nature around him. At the end of the poem, he states that after viewing this unforgettable imagery, his heart had been lifted. He talks of how the nature upon further analyzing, has become less marvelous, and the speaker’s concluding response is highlighted by the poem’s strong use of remarkable organization, insightful diction, exhilarating figurative language.

Organization is very important throughout this poem. The author lays out his descriptions clearly. “Ripe apples were caught like red fish in the nets of their branches.” (Lines 3-4). This descriptive language shows the respect for nature the man has. It also symbolizes the apple’s fate being decided upon the branch, similar to how a fish’s fate is decided by something other then the fish itself because it is trapped in the net. Updike uses lots of colorful organization as he describes nature and its qualities. “The maples were colored like apples, part orange and red, part green.” (Lines 4-6). The descriptive language coming from this writing shows the very epicenter of human nature to the writer. The tone is extremely positive, and the organization of the entire poem throughout helps the concluding response. In Line 11, the poet states that the “trumpeting made us look up and around”. This line shows the reason as to why the author has begun to look around, noticing the imperfections the latter stanzas describe. The poem starts of in a positive attitude, however as the poem progresses the author begins to analyze nature more closely, and it becomes apparent to him that nature had become “…less marvelous…” (Line 25)....
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