Great Gatsby; American Dream

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Alaina Mehrtens
Great Gatsby Analysis
Mr. Labush
2/26/11

The ideal of the American Dream is based on the fantasy that an individual can achieve success regardless of family history, race, or religion simply by working hard enough. Frequently, “success” is equated with the fortune that the independent, self-reliant individual can win. In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald examines and critiques Jay Gatsby’s particular vision of the 1920s American Dream. The novel is an exploration of the American Dream as it exists in a corrupt period of history. Gatsby based his whole self-being on how much money he earned and the possessions he had. He felt that with money came many other advantages to life. Gatsby’s sole purpose for acquiring wealth was to win back his old love. Gatsby had no true friends and used all this money and wealth enable to have those friends and these friends used him for huis money and did not truly care about him has a person. When Gatsby first met Daisy he was underprivileged and considered unworthy because of his lower class status. He knew that while he was poor there was no chance of them ever uniting as a couple. “I was poor”, Gatsby had no money and he thought that Daisy “was tired of waiting around for me” (Fitzgerald 131). Gatsby felt that the only way to win Daisy back was to reach for what many people considered the “American Dream.” Gatsby achieves “The American Dream”, but his idealistic faith in money and life’s possibility and twist his dreams and life into worthless existences based on falsehoods.
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