Great Gatbsy Housing

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Great Gatsby Housing- Symbolism

Nick's house is a sort of middle-ground between the two. He lives in the West Egg, the "less fashionable of the two," and represents someone who is from a well-established, hard-working family, but without any ideas of overreaching grandeur or societal climbing. His home is described as a, "weather-beaten cardboard bungalow at eighty a month," and from it, he can see Gatsby's overgrown mansion.Nick describes the novel as a book about Westerners, a “story of the West.” Tom, Daisy, Jordan, Gatsby, and Nick all hail from places other than the East. The romanticized American idea of going West to seek and make one’s fortune on the frontier turned on its ear in the 1920’s stock boom; now those seeking their fortune headed back East to cash in. But while Gatsby suggests there was a kind of honor in the hard work of making a fortune and building a life on the frontier, the quest for money in the East is nothing more than that: a hollow quest for money. The split between the eastern and western regions of the United States is mirrored in Gatsby by the divide between East Egg and West Egg: once again the West is the frontier of people making their fortunes, but these “Westerners” are as hollow and corrupt inside as the “Easterners.”We can notice the wonderful, unobstrusive skill with which Fitzgerald uses realistic detail symbolically. Houses in The Great Gatsby are much richer in meaning than the book's more obvious symbols, as is perhaps most evident in the way the house in Louisville where Gatsby wooes Daisy is charged for us with Gatsby's feelings. Houses are specially significant in the book for the way they emphasize the meanings inherent in its central design, which places Nick in the middle with Gatsby on one side of him and the Buchanans' on the other.Gatsby’s mansion symbolizes two broader themes of the novel. First, it represents the grandness and emptiness of the 1920s boom: Gatsby justifies living in it all alone by filling...
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